Discover the impact of meteors with Dr. Kring on Asteroid Day

On Feb. 15, 2013, with no warning, an asteroid 20 meters in diameter and weighing more than the Eiffel Tower plunged into the Earth’s atmosphere over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk at speeds in excess of 19 kilometers per second. At such a high speed, the 14,000-ton object exploded at altitude, creating a flash 30 times brighter than the sun and panicking Siberian residents.

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The Chelyabinsk meteor injured 1,500 people and damaged 7,200 buildings in 2013.

The air burst damaged 7,200 buildings and injured 1,500 people, mostly due to cuts from broken glass, but many reported ultraviolet burns similar to sun damage and blindness from the flash. It was not the impact that caused the most damage, but the explosion as it suddenly fell apart in the atmosphere, about 25 times more energy than the atomic bomb detonated over Hiroshima.

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The impact crater caused by the Chelyabinsk meteor.

The largest meteor impact since the Tunguska event on June 30, 1908 that flattened 80 million trees, Chelyabinsk served as a grim reminder that asteroids still pose a credible threat to the planet the same way they did for the dinosaurs. A massive asteroid collided with the Earth 65 million years ago, bringing about the demise of megafauna like Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops, along with more than half of the plants and animals living in the late Cretaceous. Scientists agree the asteroid responsible for this mass extinction hit the Yucatan, causing the Chicxulub crater. And the threat remains, this time for us.

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Dr. David Kring, the man who discovered and named the Chicxulub crater.

Dr. David Kring of the Lunar and Planetary Institute, the scientists who discovered and named the Chicxulub for a Mayan village near the center of the crater, will pay a visit to the Houston Museum of Natural Science on Asteroid Day, June 30, at 6:30 p.m. His lecture will examine methods to mitigate the threat of meteor impacts to humanity, and guests will have a chance to engage in a Q&A session during the lecture. The Burke Baker Planetarium will offer special screenings of Impact at 6 and 8 p.m., complimentary with a ticket to Kring’s lecture.

Join us to learn more about asteroid impacts and other phenomena on Asteroid Day. Survival favors the informed. Tickets $18, Members $12.

A big rock for Valentine’s Day? Watch our VP of Astronomy Carolyn Sumners discuss the massive asteroid zooming past Earth on Feb. 15

If you anticipated seeing stars this Valentine’s Day, you weren’t far off.

Asteroid 2012 DA14 is projected to pass “dangerously close” to earth Feb. 15 — potentially taking out some important communication satellites.

Carolyn Sumners talks Valentine's Asteroid on MyFoxHouston

Discovered last year, the asteroid is half the length of a football field, weighs 130,000 metric tons and will pass Earth at a closer distance than the Moon at some 17,000 miles per hour. But astronomers, including HMNS’ own VP of Astronomy Carolyn Sumners, have put our stammering hearts to rest — sort of:

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“Asteroids this size – the one we’re talking about for next week – can destroy a city, not a planet,” Sumners told MyFoxHouston.

Luckily, NASA says there’s no chance of impact. This year, the cosmic love’s on you.

Don’t miss the Geminid Meteor Shower this Friday night! Here’s how, where and when to view

The annual Geminid Meteor Shower peaks this weekend, and we’ve got some tips for stargazers hoping to catch it.

The New Moon falls on Thursday, Dec. 13 this year, which should guarantee us nice, dark night for viewing. The Geminid Meteor shower peaks every December and is one of the best, most reliable showers, producing an average of 100 meteors per hour.

A Geminid meteor in 2009, as viewed from San Francisco
A Geminid meteor in 2009, as viewed from San Francisco, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Says HMNS Astronomer James Wooten: “The Geminids are unique among meteor showers because they are associated not with a comet but with an asteroid, 3200 Phaethon. This means that with Geminids, we see significant activity much earlier in the night than with other showers.”

That means instead of having to wait until the wee morning hours to see this beautiful shower, meteors will start radiating from the constellation Gemini as early as 9 or 10 p.m., although the shower will likely peak just before dawn.

As with all showers, the Geminid Meteor Shower will be best viewed away from city light pollution. The George Observatory will be open Friday night and into Saturday morning for observation. For directions to The George, located just an hour south of Houston, click here. Entry to Brazos Bend State Park is $7 per person; free for kids under 12. You don’t need any special equipment for viewing, just a chair, blankets and maybe some hot apple cider.

If you observe the meteor shower and are able to capture some great photos, share them with our Flickr group or by using the hashtag #hmnsgeminid on Twitter and Instagram. If Facebook’s your thing, post your photos on our wall, or tag us, and we’ll compile a credited album of everyone’s shots!

Science Doesn’t Sleep (9.4.08)

Released to Public: Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 Spacewalk (NASA)
“Houston…we’ve got a
SPAM problem.”
Creative Commons License photo credit:
pingnews.com

So here’s what went down after you logged off.

There’s a new Manhattan floating around the Arctic – and it’s made of ice. Canada’s polar ice shelves are “crumbling at an alarming pace.” In other good news: sea levels will rise much faster than we thought.

It’s possibly the lamest thing ever done in space: yesterday, astronauts spent some time updating their antivirus software.

It was the fake mustaches that tipped them off. Up to 10 percent of Near Earth Objects are comets impersonating asteroids – and new research aims to unmask them.

It’s really, really big: a black hole as big as 50 billion suns.

The ocean has its own lakes – called meddies – and scientists are using oil industry tech to study them.