September Flickr Photo of the Month: Baby Alligators!

_DSC8853_R1_C1BM-LR
_DSC8853_R1_C1BM-LR by Mark L 2010.
Shared with permission.

There are some amazing photographers that wander the halls of HMNS – as well as our satellite facilities in the Sugar Land area. When we’re lucky, they share what they capture in our HMNS Flickr pool. Each month, we highlight one of these photos here on the blog.

This month, we’re featuring a photo from Mark L 2010, taken in Brazos Bend State Park – home to the Museum’s George Observatory. Spending the day there wildlife spotting is a perfect lead in to stargazing at the Observatory on a Saturday night. And as you can see – the animals are really cool!

Here’s what Mark had to say about his photo:

On Labor Day, 2011, we visited Brazos Bend State Park to take a look around and shoot a few photos. Just beyond the shore line of 40 Acre Lake against the fishing pier we saw a dozen or so baby alligators. The duck weed coated them completely, making an interesting sight.

Maybe more striking was the fact that as they were sleeping in the sun they were laying on one another much like you would expect of puppies. It was just a nice view of young wild life. We all wish our area could break out of the grip of this destructive drought, but it is surprising how beauty remains available in this park. Thanks to all who participate in making it available to the rest of us.

Inspired? Most of the Museum’s permanent galleries are open for photography, and we’d love for you to share your shots with us on Flickr, Facebook or Twitter. Check out the HMNS photo policy for guidelines.

Summer Camper of the Week: Get Set To Be A Vet!

School’s out, and you know what that means – summer camp fun at HMNS!

HMNS Summer Camps: Get Set To Be A Vet!
See more summer camp fun in our set on Flickr!

This week’s photo comes from our Get Set To Be A Vet camp, where kids perform dissections to learn the inner working of an animal’s body, learn what a vet does to take care of our animal friends, and gets plenty of hands-on experience with live animals!

Looking for something fun an educational for the kids to do this summer? Lots of summer camp classes have space available – check it out!

See you at Summer Camp!

Up Close and Blurry – Texas edition

In a previous blog of a similar name, I posted some animal photo puzzles along with a clue as a challenge for you. Once again, with no photography skill and some very silly clues, here are some new puzzles with one additional hint. All of these animals can be found in Texas…

photo credit: cbattan

I am the fastest of my kind,

With sharp sight tasty birds I find,

Though in Houston I may nest,

Typically you’ll find me West.

Answer

photo credit: cbattan

Meadows and forests I snuffle through,

Eating insects, grubs and roaches too,

Scaly in appearance but a mammal tried and true,

Birthing identical young numbering two and two.

Answer

photo credit: cbattan

Small but fleet and utterly fine,

On crabs and fish I like to dine,

TEDs keep me out of shrimp net clutches,

I nest in arribadas, i.e. bunches.

Answer

photo credit: cbattan

Medium in size though my range is statewide,

Found all through Texas and in trees I may hide,

Though my spots aren’t as dark as my brother’s,

My tail is short just like all the others.

Answer

100 Years – 100 Objects: Asian Wild Dog (Dhole)

The Houston Museum of Natural Science was founded in 1909 – meaning that the curators of the Houston Museum of Natural Science have been collecting and preserving natural and cultural treasures for a hundred years now. For this yearlong series, our current curators have chosen one hundred exceptional objects from the Museum’s immense storehouse of specimens and artifacts—one for each year of our history. Check back here frequently to learn more about this diverse selection of behind-the-scenes curiosities—we will post the image and description of a new object every few days.

asian-wild-dog-dhole

This description is from Dan, the museum’s curator of vertebrate zoology. He’s chosen a selection of objects that represent the most fascinating animals in the Museum’s collections, that we’ll be sharing here – and at 100.hmns.org- throughout the year.

As a rule, one of the policies in the Vertebrate Zoology Collection is not to acquire any shoulder mounts of specimens.  They are of no use for exhibition, and little use for research. 

This Dhole shoulder mount represents the only shoulder mount in the entire Vertebrate Zoology Collection, originally accessioned into the collection in 1971.  The reason we still have it is because Dholes are poorly represented in Natural History Collections, and thus of interest as a representative of this species.

You can see more images of this fascinating artifact – as well as the others we’ve posted so far this year – in the 100 Objects section at 100.hmns.org