Girls Exploring Math and Science 2015

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Last Saturday, we celebrated our 10th year of hosting Girls Exploring Math and Science (GEMS) at HMNS! Despite the questionable weather, we had a spectacular turnout! From underwater robots to photobooths, we had it all.

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The GEMS event includes two sections – community booths and student booths. Our community booths are hosted by local STEM organizations. They present STEM activities or demonstrations to young students and they talk about how they got their STEM careers. This year, the Subsea Tiebeck Foundation brought an exhibit called SEATIGER. It’s a giant tank containing an underwater ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) for students to learn about how STEM is involved with the offshore and subsea industries. GEMS also included fault line activities, polymer demonstrations, and astronaut dexterity challenges from some of our other community booths!

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In addition, GEMS hosts student booths. As a student booth, students present a project relating to science, technology, engineering or math to peers as well as adults. Every year we award the top three projects with prize money for their school, club or Girl Scout troop. This year we had some exceptional projects! Third place went to Girl Scout Troop 17492 for their project, The Human Battery. Like true scientists, these fourth grade girls had to reconstruct their experiment after their first attempt failed. Luckily, they reconstructed their experiment, and found an alternative way to power a battery using lemons instead! The second place team was another group of Girl Scouts, Troop 126005. Their project, POP! The Power of Programming, examined the intricacies of computer programming and each of the girls designed their own small program too! First place went to Jersey Voltage, the Jersey Village High School Robotics team. The team built a robot that could throw a ball, and they demonstrated their robots talent by playing catch with some GEMS participants! They plan to use their winnings to take their robot to a robotics competition in Texas or Louisiana!

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We hope that everyone that joined us at GEMS 2015 had a great time! If you took some photos in our smilebooth, you can see them here!

Join us at GEMS next year on Saturday, February 20, 2016!!

Wonder Women of STEM: Dr. Mae Jemison, the first African-American female astronaut.

Editor’s Note: This post is the fourth in a series featuring influential women from STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields in the lead up to HMNS’ annual GEMS (Girls Exploring Math and Science) event, February 21, 2015. Click here to get involved!

 

We’ve seen some amazing women in STEM, but none are quite so out of this world as Dr. Mae Jemison, the first African-American female astronaut. In 1992, she orbited the earth for over a week on the space shuttle Endeavor and logged over 190 hours in space!

Dr. Jemison had numerous accomplishments in addition to her space travel. She began her college career at age 16 by attending Stanford University on scholarship. Within 4 years, she graduated with a BS in Chemical Engineering and a BA in African and African-American Studies from Stanford University. She continued her studies at Cornell University where she received her doctorate degree in medicine. A few years later, she proceeded to volunteer for over two years with the Peace Corps in Western Africa where she taught health education and contributed to research concerning the Hepatitis B vaccination among others.

After all of her volunteer work, Jemison applied to be part of the NASA Space Program and was one of 15 people selected out of 2000 to join the Space Program in 1987. She joined her first orbiting mission in 1992 with Endeavor. While aboard Endeavor, she worked with other astronauts on bone cell research along with other experiments and investigations. Although her time in space was short, she was able to claim the title of first female African-American in space. In May of 1993, Dr. Jemison left NASA to teach at Dartmouth College and continue to educate future generations.

In addition to her space travels, Dr. Jemison has a list of accomplishments that would knock your socks off. She can speak four languages, wrote her own book called “Find Where the Wind Goes,” was on the cover of JET Magazine, hosted the World of Wonders TV show, and was voted one of the 50 Most Beautiful People according to People Magazine. If that’s not enough, she’s also got a sense of humor. She talks about her experiences in Brazil for the 20th anniversary of the Apollo missions and she comments, “Wow!! Y’all need to be glad I didn’t go to Brazil before NASA or I’d still be there doing development work and the Samba on the beach.” Like I said, impressive!

Space was not the first major accomplishment for Dr. Mae Jemison, and it certainly won’t be her last. She continues to expand interest in science education through her foundation, The Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence. She created The Earth We Share, international science camp for students as well as a program to encourage hands-on, science education through Teachers.

If you are inspired by women such as Dr. Mae Jemison, then you’ll enjoy meeting some of the local ladies of STEM at GEMS this weekend. Come to HMNS between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. to learn more about science, technology, engineering and math! We’ll even have representatives from NASA!

Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 2/16-2/22

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Bust out your planners, calendars, and PDAs (if you are throwback like that), it’s time to mark your calendars for the HMNS events of this week!  

Behind-the-Scenes – Samurai: The Way Of The Warrior
Tuesday, February 17
6:00 p.m.
Witness the exquisite objects related to the legendary Samurai warriors of Japan in the special exhibition Samurai: The Way of the Warrior. Museum master docents will lead you through the collection that includes full suits of armor, helmets, swords, sword-hilts, and saddles, as well as exquisite objects intended for more personal use such as lacquered writing boxes, incense trays and foldable chairs. 

Behind-the-Scenes – Wildlife Photographer Of The Year
Tuesday, February 17
6:00 p.m.
Featuring 100 awe-inspiring images, from fascinating animal behavior to breathtaking wild landscapes,Wildlife Photographer of the Year harnesses the power of photography to promote the discovery, understanding and responsible enjoyment of the natural world. Tour this visually stunning exhibition with our resident photographers David Temple and Janell Nelson.

GEMS 2015
Saturday, February 21, 2015
9 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
The Girl Scouts of San Jacinto Council and the Houston Museum of Natural Science invite you to attend the Girls Exploring Math and Science (GEMS) event. The Museum will be filled with hands-on science and math for everyone to experience. Local professionals will be at the Museum to answer questions about their careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

Thanks to the Society of Petroleum Engineers / Gulf Coast Section for its support of GEMS 2015!

Telescope Classes
George Observatory

Saturday, February 21
Did you get a new telescope? The box made it sound easy to use. Come let an expert astronomer help you set it up and polar align your scope so that it will work. It is not as easy as the box would lead you to believe! After you get some help, then it will be easy and enjoyable. 

Refractor And Reflection Telescope Class
1:00 – 2:30

Go-To Computerized Telescope Class
3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Wonder Women of STEM: Beatrice Alice Hicks, a woman ahead of her time

Editor’s Note: This post is the third in a series featuring influential women from STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields in the lead up to HMNS’ annual GEMS (Girls Exploring Math and Science) event, February 21, 2015. Click here to get involved! 

Born in 1919 in Orange, New Jersey, Beatrice Alice Hicks was a woman ahead of her time. In the course of her life, she earned multiple degrees, pioneered the woman’s role in the field of engineering, and co-founded a women’s engineering society.

As a child, she was inspired by the construction of the empire state building to pursue a career in engineering. She attained her first degree in chemical engineering from Newark College of Engineering. Shortly afterwards, she became the first woman engineer hired at Western Electric in 1942 where she designed telephone equipment that would later be used for the first long distance phone system. Upon leaving Western Electric, she continued her education at Stevens Institute of Technology and received her master’s degree in physics.

Hicks continued her innovative approach to engineering when she joined her late father’s company as chief engineer. In 1962, Hicks patented a density switch. It monitored the density of a sealed environment and signaled when the density changed. Her invention was integral in the Apollo space missions to the moon! It informed the astronauts if there was a leak in the ship. She created a number of other environmental sensors throughout the duration of her career that were used in additional space missions as well as aircraft development. 

All of Beatrice Hick’s personal accomplishments were extremely impressive, but she wanted to do more. At the time, the United States was in need of more engineers, and Hicks had the perfect solution – women engineers! She felt that women were not being encouraged to study engineering.

In 1951, she and a few female engineers co-founded the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). Their goal was “to inform the public of the availability of qualified women for engineering positions; to foster a favorable attitude in industry for women engineers; and to contribute to their professional advancement.” When SWE started, it had 65 members and it has grown to include over 16,000 women! 

Hicks was elected president of SWE in 1951 and she travelled the country giving speeches and interviews about the role of women in engineering. Encouraging women to pursue a higher education, and serving as a role model for young engineers for generations to come. We hope you will stop by the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) booth this year at GEMS and be inspired by these female engineers! Come see Beatrice Hicks’ legacy and get excited about engineering.

 

HMNS is highlighting females that made contributions to STEM fields leading up to our annual GEMS (Girls Exploring Math and Science) event, February 21, 2015!

Girls Exploring Math and Science (GEMS) is an event that showcases some of the great things girls do with science, technology, engineering and math! Students can present a project on a STEM related subject for the chance to earn prize money for their school.