Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 11/16-11/22

Bust out your planners, calendars, and PDAs (if you are throwback like that), it’s time to mark your calendars for the HMNS events of this week! 

Jingle Tree 3

Film Screening – The Northern Lights: Nature’s Spectacle with Pal Brekke
Monday, Nov. 16
7:00 p.m.
Imagine what it must have been like for the first northern inhabitants to raise their eyes to the dazzle of the Northern Lights. The Aurora Borealis still casts its mysterious and colorful spell over us, and Norwegian solar physicist Dr. Pal Brekke has captured that enduring fascination in a new documentary, The Northern Lights: A Magic Experience.

Sip ‘n See Open House & Luncheon
Tuesday, Nov 17. 
11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
HMNS at Sugar Land
Next up is our open house Sip n See, Tuesday, November 17, from 11:30 am to 1:30 pm. This fabulous strolling lunch event will allow you, your friends and associates to see the trees up close and perhaps even “pre-buy” the one you fall in love with!

Lecture – Fire Masters: Cooking and Feasting 10,000 Years Ago by Andrew McCarthy
Tuesday, Nov. 17
6:30 p.m.
The food we eat and its preparation define us as humans as few things do. Archaeologists theorize that cooking and feasting enabled the human brain to expand. Excavations on Cyprus reveal the presence of large stone ovens much larger than a single tribe required, apparently for the purpose of sharing feasts in the Neolithic period dating to 10,000 years ago. Dr. Andrew McCarthy will explore how cooking and feasting may be decisive steps toward the development of civilization. Perhaps the origin of our holiday feasts is result of humankind³ greatest prehistoric inventions.

Drink and be Merry Happy Hour and Auction Closing
Thursday, Nov. 19
5:30 – 8:30 p.m.
HMNS at Sugar Land
We’ll wrap things up with a cool Happy Hour, Thursday, November 19, an evening filled with cocktails, tree viewing, on-line bidding and a fabulous live auction. All bids close that evening at 8:00 pm!

Class – Atlatl Workshop: Stone Age Spear Slinging
Saturday, Nov. 21
9:00 a.m.
Journey into prehistory by literally chucking the past! Experimental archaeologist Dr. August Costa will introduce you to the science and prehistory of hand-cast projectiles and biomechanics of their use. Participants will build their own cane dart and learn how construct throwers. After instruction on using the Stone Age spear-throwe–the atlatl, participants will fling full-scale replicas at stationary targets. The class will culminate in a tournament competition, with a sharp grand prize.

Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 11/2-11/8

Bust out your planners, calendars, and PDAs (if you are throwback like that), it’s time to mark your calendars for the HMNS events of this week! 


Film Screening – Making North Armerica with Dr. Robert T. Bakker
Tuesday, Nov. 3
6:00 p.m.
Join Dr. Robert T. Bakker for the premiere event of NOVA’s Making North America television series on the Museum’s giant screen. Airing on PBS this November, this series is a spectacular road trip through a tumultuous deep past that explores three fundamental questions: How was the continent built? How did life evolve here? And how has the continent shaped us? “Ancient Rock Show” begins at 5 p.m. with hands-on activities and demonstrations. This event is sponsored by NOVA.

Lecture – T.rex – The Shocking Truth by Dr. Robert T. Bakker, Ph.D. 
Wednesday, Nov. 4 
6:30 p.m.
Legendary paleontologist Dr. Robert T. Bakker will reveal the untold story of Tyrannosaurus rex, the top predators in deep time. In his popular energetic and entertaining style, Dr. Bakker will the latest theories on how T. rex dominated the Cretaceous before the mass KT extinction. Dr. Robert T. Bakker is curator of paleontology at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. Dino activities begin at 5:30 p.m.

Breakfast with Dr. Bakker
Saturday, Nov. 7
9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Treat your little paleontologist to breakfast with world-famous paleontologist Dr. Robert Bakker. This annual FUNdraiser, benefiting HMNS, offers an opportunity for kids to meet Dr. Bakker, watch his entertaining presentation, enjoy a delicious breakfast and participate in dinosaur activities not open to the general public. Dr. Bakker will also sign autographs and copies of his books will be available.

Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 9/21-9/27

Bust out your planners, calendars, and PDAs (if you are throwback like that), it’s time to mark your calendars for the HMNS events of this week! 


Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear And Freedom In America Opens Friday, September 25
SPIES, TRAITORS, SABOTEURS reveals nine major events and periods in U.S. history when Americans were threatened by enemies within its borders. It depicts how the government and public responded, illustrates the corresponding evolution of U.S. counterintelligence and homeland security efforts, and examines the challenge of securing the nation without compromising the civil liberties upon which it was founded.

Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America is a creation of the International Spy Museum.

Fall Plant Sale
Saturday, September 26
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. (or until sold out)
7th floor of the parking garage
Interested in Butterfly Gardening? The perfect opportunity to get started awaits you twice each year, at the Cockrell Butterfly Center’s semi-annual plant sales! Once in spring and once in fall, we offer a wide variety of nectar plants for butterflies and host plants for their caterpillars. Plenty of experts are on hand to answer your butterfly gardening questions and help you to create the perfect butterfly habitat – right in your own backyard.

Fan Faves for 30 Day Film Festival
September 1-30, 2015
Experience the 7 greatest adventures on Earth in a single day!
From the depths of the ocean to the top of the clouds, from ancient ages to modern marvels, now you can embark on seven astounding expeditions, and never leave your seat! The most popular movies return to the Houston Museum of Natural Science during the Fan Faves for 30 Days Film Festival. Relive these amazing 3-D adventures or catch them for the first time! But hurry, the fun ends Sept. 30.

Color and Create for the Secret Ocean Art Contest!

The bright colors of life on the coral reef inspire artists all over the globe. How well does your art measure up? Show off your talent through the Secret Ocean Art Contest, and you could win free museum tickets and an artist feature on the big screen! Check out some of our ideas below and learn how to enter the contest before the Sept. 25 deadline.

In the saltwater world captured in Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Secret Ocean 3Dwe see many animals with bright colors and vibrant patterns, and struggle to find some of the animals hiding in plain sight. Coloration plays an important role to survival in most environments. Animals with appropriate coloration can be better at confusing predators, attracting mates, or blending in to catch the next meal. Every animal has its own approach to coloration, and they each use it for more than just beauty.

Dangerous distraction

The lionfish is known for its large elegant fins and the impressive venomous spines along its back, but the red-striped pattern of the lionfish makes it a fierce predator at the top of its food chain. The lionfish does not use its venomous spines to capture prey. The venom is meant to protect the lionfish from other predators, and it is quite successful! The bright pattern on its body warns predators that the lionfish is venomous. Its warning coloration may be the reason there are no known predators for the lionfish that were introduced into the Caribbean.


Flickr Creative Commons.

Bright beauty

The clownfish is also known for its distinct color pattern. Unlike the lionfish, clownfish coloration does not serve as a warning. Rather, it helps them avoid predation. The white stripes break up the body of the clownfish making it harder for another animal to see. Using stripes and spots in this manner is called disruptive coloration. The disruptive coloration on the clownfish can confuse a predator for just enough time and allow the clownfish to retreat safely into its anemone.


Flickr Creative Commons.

Clever camouflage

One of the best color patterns for animals is one that goes unnoticed entirely. It’s hard to catch an animal that you cannot find. The octopus is well known for its ability to change the color and texture of its skin to blend into its surroundings. This camouflage can help the animal escape predators as well as sneak up on unassuming prey. An octopus can also mimic rocks, algae and even coconuts to blend in to all sorts of environments.


Flickr Creative Commons.

Now, combine your artistic talent with your knowledge of coloration for our contest! To compete, print out a copy of the rules and the Secret Ocean art contest template, then create your masterpiece. You can use paint, crayons, sand, glitter, beads and almost anything you can think of to create a fish or octopus. Don’t forget to submit before the deadline, Sept. 25! The top pieces will win great prizes like tickets to the HMNS permanent exhibit halls or to a showing of Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Secret Ocean 3D at the Wortham Giant Screen Theatre. Your artwork could also be projected onto the big screen!

Give us your best shot! We’re looking forward to your colorful creations. Best of luck!