Educator How-To: The eyes have it in this DIY optical illusion

Your eyes are amazing sensory organs. They help you understand shape, color and form, judge distance and alert you to potential dangers. What you perceive as “seeing” is actually the result of a complex series of events that occur between your brain, your eyes and the world around you.

Light reflected from an object passes through the cornea of the eye and moves through the lens, which focuses it. The light then reaches the retina at the very back of the eye, where it meets a thin layer of color-sensitive cells called the rods and cones. Information from the retina travels from the eye to the brain via the optic nerve.

Because eyes see from slightly different positions, the brain must mix the two images it receives to get a complete picture. The light also crisscrosses while going through the cornea so the retina “sees” the image upside down. The brain then “reads” the image and turns it right-side up.

The rods and cones are what you call photoreceptors. When they are overworked, they lose sensitivity. Normally the small movements of your eyes that you make unconsciously, or regular blinking, will keep these photoreceptors sharp and happy. If you are looking at a large enough image, where your eyes can’t rest, or if you purposely hold your eyes still, you will tire out your poor rods and cones and they will adapt to this overstimulation by no longer responding. When you move your eyes to a blank space, your worn out photoreceptors create an “afterimage”.  An afterimage is where your eyes produce a ghost image, like when you stare at something a little too bright and you see dark spots in your field of vision. In an afterimage, light portions of the original image are replaced by dark portions and dark portions are replaced by light portions.

Try this out for yourself by doing the following activity. 

You will create the Texas state flag in some unusual colors. After you stare at this incorrectly colored flag and have worn out your photoreceptors, looking at a blank wall will create a ghost image of the Texas state flag in red, white and blue!

Activity:  Negative Afterimage

Materials:
Scissors
Glue
Paper
Green construction paper
Black construction paper
Yellow construction paper 

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Procedure:

1. Cut your green and yellow papers in thirds, width-wise.

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2. Cut a star out of the middle of your yellow piece.

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3. Glue the yellow piece to one end of the black piece.
4. Turn the black paper so that your yellow piece is placed on the left.

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5. Glue the green piece to the bottom of the black piece.
6. Trim off any extra green.

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Now stare at the flag for a minute or so. Try not to have much in your peripheral vision so that you can concentrate on the flag.

Look away from the flag at a neutral colored wall or piece of paper.  You should be able to see the flag in red, white and blue!

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Have a school group and want to know more about how your eyes work?  Sign up for an Eyeball Dissection with our Labs on Demand.  These labs make a great addition to a field trip, but are also available to come to your school.

Interested in knowing more about how your body works?  Visit Body Carnival, a carnival-themed interactive exhibit that explores the connections between perception and the laws of physics in the human body, at HMNS Sugar Land. Enjoy learning about the human body while investigating force, pressure, light, and color. Crawl through a giant artery to see and hear the effects of restricted blood flow, test your balance in the 10-foot Dizzy Tunnel or don a pair of vision-distorting goggles and discover how sight affects your ability to walk straight. There’s a lot to explore!

 

One with nature: Photographer Amy Shutt teaches you how to capture the world through your lens

Do you love nature? Do you also love photography? Well then you’re in luck! On August 6, HMNS is excited to host a workshop with nature photographer Amy Shutt.

AMY_3976-1-fbIn this exotic photography adventure, students will learn how to get the best nature shots possible when photographing animals, insects and flora. Amy will teach you the basics of your DSLR camera, leaving you with an understanding of how to use aperture, shutter speed, and ISO together to get out of Auto mode.

Students will then venture out to photograph the insects, animals, flowers and plants in the Cockrell Butterfly Center. We will also work on photographing the waterfall to get soft velvety water shots. All participants will receive one-on-one instruction with their equipment.

1463010_10200426208652378_1926119065_nAmy Shutt is a regular contributing photographer to 225 Magazine and is on the Board of Directors of the New Orleans and Gulf South Chapter of ASMP. She is also an active member of North American Nature Photography AssociationProfessional Photographers of America, American Society of Media Photographers, and HeartsSpeak

You may view her portfolio at amyshutt.com and her workshops website at amyshuttworkshops.com.

HMNS Adult Hands-On Class
Nature Photography Workshop
Wednesday, August 6, 2:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Tickets $200, Members $150
Click here for tickets and information.

AMY_9239-1-900-fb-nocrAmy Shutt’s love of photography began at an early age. She always had a Polaroid handy, shot a now-defunct disc camera in her tweens, and received her first 35mm when she was 11. A self-described “ditch rat” (because she hung out in the ditch behind her house watching and catching turtles, snakes, and bullfrogs as a kid), Amy has always had a deep appreciation for animals and nature. Growing up in Louisiana, she was exposed to its unique flora and fauna, and that has remained deeply set in her veins over the years. Observing nature went hand-in-hand with photographing nature; it came naturally to her. 

She now specializes in nature, animal, food, editorial, and commercial photography in Baton Rouge and beyond. She also teaches various photography classes, nature photography workshops, and lighting workshops throughout the seasons in Louisiana, Texas, California, and Colorado. 

When Amy is not shooting in the studio, her favorite things to photograph are still flora, fauna, landscapes, and all things nature. She especially loves the swamps of her home state of Louisiana and the coast and deserts of California. Married to ornithologist Van Remsen of LSU Museum of Natural Sciences, she is constantly exposed to nature in her every day married life, whether it be birding or working in the hummingbird garden in the yard. This has proved to fuel her passion for photographing wildlife and landscapes over the recent years. 

In 2014, Amy partnered with world-renowned Audubon Zoo in New Orleans to develop and teach Basic, Advanced, and Specialized Photography Classes that focus on animal photography as well as conservation and animal education. She has since branched out to other zoos and natural science facilities to develop and teach photography classes and workshops.

Amy feels teaching people about photographing nature and animals can forge a strong relationship and a sense of deep respect between humans and the flora and fauna we live side-by-side with on this planet — a bond that only becomes deeper the more one photographs. 

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Help us thank the birds and bees (and bats, moths and flies!) during National Pollinator Week

For the next several paragraphs, we’ll be talking about a few very special flying creatures (and some others) that are called pollinators — to whom we owe huge thanks for providing much of the food we eat! 

Without these pollinators to carry their pollen from flower to flower, plants could not form fruits or seeds to reproduce themselves and feed our whole ecosystem of hungry animals — including humans. Did you know that at least one of every three bites you take is thanks to a pollinator? (More if you are vegetarian.)

Although the world’s pollinators include many of the animals you’d expect and more (e.g., also butterflies, beetles, monkeys, even some rodents and lizards), the most important pollinators of our fruit and vegetable crops are insects, particularly bees. Unfortunately, today many pollinators are in danger due to habitat loss, overuse of insecticides, and other factors. To learn more about the threats facing pollinators and what you can do to help, visit the Pollinator Partnership’s webpage at pollinator.org.

National Pollinator Week, June 16-23 this year, was initiated by a group of biologists calling themselves the “Pollinator Partnership,” whose goal was to bring the public’s attention to the vital ecosystem services provided by pollinating bees, butterflies and moths, beetles, birds, and bats — and to make people aware of the urgent issue of their declining populations. 

Seven years ago, the U.S. Senate voted unanimously to designate a week each June to commemorate the importance of pollinators. Pollinator Week has now grown to be an international celebration.

From feasting to beekeeping, learn more about the efforts of these hardworking — and essential — animals in three special events planned for National Pollinator Week. 

Behind-the-Scenes Tour of the Cockrell Butterfly Center
Tuesday, June 17, 6 p.m.

In addition to the Butterfly Center and Insect Zoo, you will visit the containment room and rooftop greenhouses — areas not open to the public where staff cares for the Museum’s butterflies and other insects. Kids 5 and above welcome! Click here for ticket info.

Beekeeping Class
Wednesday, June 18, 6 p.m.

From the tools and techniques needed to start your own apiary to tips of daily life with bees, beekeeper Shelley Rice will share the basics of starting your own beehive and how to harvest wax and honey naturally and safely. Participants will meet at Shelley’s private apiary. Advance registration required. Click here for ticket info.

Cultural Feast: A Culinary Cultivation — All About the Birds and the Bees
Sunday, June 22, 6 p.m.

In the perfect kick off to summer, join the staff of the Cockrell Butterfly Center at Haven for a five-course meal showcasing the contributions of bees and other pollinators to our food sources prepared by chef Randy Evans. Culinary historian Merrianne Timko will discuss the culinary history of these pollinator-focused ingredients. Advance reservations required by June 16. Click here for more information and to purchase tickets online. 

School’s (almost) out for summer: Time to xplore with our Xplorations Summer Camps!

Summer Camp is here again!  As we busily prepare, buying all the weird odds and ends it takes to run camp here (everything from plastic spoons to sheep eyeballs), I thought I would share a bit about camp with you.

Xplorations Summer Camp 14Recently I gave a presentation to fellow HMNS staff members about Xplorations Summer Camp, just a little informal FYI. I was surprised at how many of them stopped me later in the day and said, “I didn’t know that ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_________.” 

The No. 1 item they commented on was the sheer size of our summer camps. We have approximately 550 campers per week at HMNS in Hermann Park. This means that, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, we are larger than your average elementary school each week for the eight weeks of camp. 

Because of this, we take safety very seriously … which brings us to the second most surprising camp fact I shared: Staffers were also amazed to learn that all the full-time Youth Education Programs staff regularly has First-Aid, Epi-Pen injection, and Heart Saver/AED training. We have found that parents really like getting their campers back in the afternoon in same condition as when they signed them in in the morning. To that end, we feel like we should be prepared for a whole range of potential problems — everything from a Band-Aid solve-able boo-boo to a zombie apocalypse.

Our number one goal is to keep our campers safe!  A close second is to have fun while learning.

And because we are always learning new things around here, I learned how to make this infographic with some of the other numbers and statistics our staff found interesting about Xplorations Summer Camp. 

Summer Camp InfographicIf you haven’t signed up your little scientists, you’d better do it quickly.  Spots are vanishing before our eyes! 

Camp is an excellent, hands-on way to introduce kids to topics in science. They learn, have fun and are able to explore themes and careers that can help them change the world. Perfect for kids age 6-12, sign up for Xplorations Summer Camps today! Click here to see our full catalog of age-specific camps.