Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 7/13-7/19

Bust out your planners, calendars, and PDAs (if you are throwback like that), it’s time to mark your calendars for the HMNS events of this week! 

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Lecture – Sustainable Seas: The Vision, The Reality By Sylvia Earle
Tuesday, July 14
7:00 p.m.
Dr. Sylvia Earle, revered marine biologist and conservationist, will give a state of the seas address. The event will include a viewing of the new giant-screen film Secret Ocean 3D that features a narration by Dr. Earle and amazing imagery captured by director Jean-Michel Cousteau and his team.

Behind-the-Scenes – Jedi – Samurai Tour
Thursday, July 16
6:00 p.m.
Armored warriors of the past inspired the creative genius of a filmmaker-in a galaxy not so far away. In this multimedia tour of the Samurai: The Way of the Warrior exhibit–led by HMNS staff and a few guest Jedi, Sith and samurai guides–the origins of many of George Lucas’ Star Wars heroes and villains will be unveiled. You will also enjoy demonstrations of light saber and kendo katana. The compelling links between Samurai and Jedi will build your appreciation for both.

Weird Science Event! A Summer Science Experience
HMNS at Sugar Land
Friday, July 17
6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Challenge your brain and develop your S-IQ (Science IQ) with hands-on experiments, demonstrations and observation. It’s the all-new Weird Science Event! Peek behind the curtain for an exclusive look at how “cool” science works in a museum. Mix, stir and mash compounds around the T-rex pit and make all kinds of goopy fun. Help feed the fish and other critters, plus learn how to care for them. Or you can try going arboreal and hang out in a tree in the TreeHouses exhibit. It’s our biggest science night of the year with something for everyone!

Mixers & Elixirs
Saturday, July 18
7:00 p.m.
The social set has never looked so smart! Mixers & Elixirs is back and it’s better than ever! We’re celebrating the year’s geekiest holidays with a cool twist, so pop on over to our place to mingle, clink your cocktail glass, and break out your best dance moves. Doors open at 7 p.m. for the live band, dancing, cash bars, and the city’s best food trucks. The perfect party, where the science club meets the social set, happens each month from June through August. Hitting this scene is a sure sign of intelligence!
This event is for 21 and up only.

Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 6/29-7/5

Bust out your planners, calendars, and PDAs (if you are throwback like that), it’s time to mark your calendars for the HMNS events of this week!

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Lecture – Climate And The Demise Of Maya Civilization By Andre Droxler
Monday, June 29
6:30 p.m.
Climate conditions in the Maya’s time can be retrieved from the earth revealing that climate conditions influenced the destiny of the Maya. Geological data from Belize’s Central Shelf Lagoon and Blue Hole, areas proximal to where Maya Civilization thrived and then abruptly collapse are revealing that weather—rainfall fluctuations and frequent tropical cyclones—may have forced the Maya to abandon their sophisticated cities. Dr. André Droxler of the Center for the Study of the Environment and Society at Rice University will explain how Earth science is helping decode the history of the Maya. A special evening screening of Fate of the Maya in the Burke Baker Planetarium at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. is complimentary for lecture ticket holders.

Lecture – The Threat Of Asteroid Impacts By David Kring, Ph. D.
Tuesday, June 30

6:30 p.m.
In 2013 the world was riveted by the impact of an asteroid near the Russian town of Chelyabinsk, where over 1,000 people were injured. It was an eerie reminder of another, bigger, impact event that flattened a forest near the Tunguska River in Siberia on June 30, 1908 – and a modern-day example of the immense dinosaur-killing Chicxulub impact event in the Yucatán. Dr. David Kring of the Lunar and Planetary Institute will describe how these types of impacts events have scarred Earth in the geologic past, the magnitude of their persisting threat today, and the steps we might take to mitigate these types of calamitous events in the future. A special evening screening of Impact in the Burke Baker Planetarium at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. is complimentary for lecture ticket holders to help celebrate Asteroid Day 2015.

Take Two: Close Encounters Of The Third Kind (1977)
Friday, July 3
7:00 p.m.
After an encounter with a U.F.O., a line worker feels undeniably drawn to an isolated area in the wilderness where something spectacular is about to happen.

 

 

Discover the impact of meteors with Dr. Kring on Asteroid Day

On Feb. 15, 2013, with no warning, an asteroid 20 meters in diameter and weighing more than the Eiffel Tower plunged into the Earth’s atmosphere over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk at speeds in excess of 19 kilometers per second. At such a high speed, the 14,000-ton object exploded at altitude, creating a flash 30 times brighter than the sun and panicking Siberian residents.

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The Chelyabinsk meteor injured 1,500 people and damaged 7,200 buildings in 2013.

The air burst damaged 7,200 buildings and injured 1,500 people, mostly due to cuts from broken glass, but many reported ultraviolet burns similar to sun damage and blindness from the flash. It was not the impact that caused the most damage, but the explosion as it suddenly fell apart in the atmosphere, about 25 times more energy than the atomic bomb detonated over Hiroshima.

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The impact crater caused by the Chelyabinsk meteor.

The largest meteor impact since the Tunguska event on June 30, 1908 that flattened 80 million trees, Chelyabinsk served as a grim reminder that asteroids still pose a credible threat to the planet the same way they did for the dinosaurs. A massive asteroid collided with the Earth 65 million years ago, bringing about the demise of megafauna like Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops, along with more than half of the plants and animals living in the late Cretaceous. Scientists agree the asteroid responsible for this mass extinction hit the Yucatan, causing the Chicxulub crater. And the threat remains, this time for us.

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Dr. David Kring, the man who discovered and named the Chicxulub crater.

Dr. David Kring of the Lunar and Planetary Institute, the scientists who discovered and named the Chicxulub for a Mayan village near the center of the crater, will pay a visit to the Houston Museum of Natural Science on Asteroid Day, June 30, at 6:30 p.m. His lecture will examine methods to mitigate the threat of meteor impacts to humanity, and guests will have a chance to engage in a Q&A session during the lecture. The Burke Baker Planetarium will offer special screenings of Impact at 6 and 8 p.m., complimentary with a ticket to Kring’s lecture.

Join us to learn more about asteroid impacts and other phenomena on Asteroid Day. Survival favors the informed. Tickets $18, Members $12.

Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 6/15-6/21

Bust out your planners, calendars, and PDAs (if you are throwback like that), it’s time to mark your calendars for the HMNS events of this week!

nautilus-live-page   

Lecture – Climate And The Demise Of Maya Civilization By Andre Droxler
RESCHEDULED to Monday, June 29
6:30 p.m.
Climate conditions in the Maya’s time can be retrieved from the earth revealing that climate conditions influenced the destiny of the Maya. Geological data from Belize’s Central Shelf Lagoon and Blue Hole, areas proximal to where Maya Civilization thrived and then abruptly collapse are revealing that weather—rainfall fluctuations and frequent tropical cyclones—may have forced the Maya to abandon their sophisticated cities. Dr. André Droxler of the Center for the Study of the Environment and Society at Rice University will explain how Earth science is helping decode the history of the Maya. A special evening screening of Fate of the Maya in the Burke Baker Planetarium at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m.

Nautilus Live!
Wednesday-Sunday 
1:00 p.m.
Nautilus Live Using telepresence technology and 9 video projectors, the planetarium transports you to the Exploration Vessel Nautilus as it investigates the ocean floor. From ocean creatures to shipwrecks and black smokers, you will be part of the action, talking directly with a researcher on board the Nautilus. This is a unique LIVE full-dome experience and virtual ocean adventure. 

Behind-the-Scenes Jedi – Samurai Tour
Thursday, June 18
6:00 p.m.
Armored warriors of the past inspired the creative genius of a filmmaker-in a galaxy not so far away. In this multimedia tour of the Samurai: The Way of the Warrior exhibit–led by HMNS staff and a few guest Jedi, Sith and samurai guides–the origins of many of George Lucas’ Star Wars heroes and villains will be unveiled. You will also enjoy demonstrations of light saber and kendo katana. The compelling links between Samurai and Jedi will build your appreciation for both.

Take Two: Jaws (1975)
Friday, June 19
7:00 p.m.
When a gigantic great white shark begins to menace the small island community of Amity, a police chief, a marine scientist and grizzled fisherman set out to stop it.