Go Back in Time with the Hadza: Last of the First Movie Screening

pic 1There are fewer people connected to nature now than ever before—and no one connected to it in the same way as the Hadza. One of the last hunter-gather groups on earth, the Hadza have lived sustainably off the bounty of their ancestral homeland in Africa’s Rift Valley for at least 50,000 years. But their unique culture and way of life, including the ability to source 95 percent of their diet from the wild, has been threatened by issues as varied as continuing encroachment, aggressive tree-cutting and over-grazing.


That’s why we’ve collaborated with The Nature Conservancy to bring a special screening of the groundbreaking film The Hadza: Last of The First to HMNS on April 13. Narrated by Alfre Woodard, The Hadza: Last of The First is a call to action to establish a protective land corridor to help the Hadza survive.

“The Hadza: Last Of The First” Trailer from Benenson Productions on Vimeo.

The Nature Conservancy is one of the many organizations heeding that call. They established their Northern Tanzania project to empower the Hadza and neighboring tribes to protect their land. Through the project, the Nature Conservancy works with local partners to help the Hadza and nearby indigenous communities secure legal rights to their homeland and works to improve the Hadza’s capacity to monitor and protect their titled land, including helping to fight to extend protections for Hadza land and associated wildlife corridors, as well as protecting grazing resources for pastoralists in buffer areas surrounding Hadza titled land.

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Roughly 60 percent of Africa’s lands and waters are communally owned, so a sustained threat for millions of people is simply a lack of control. An absence of strong institutions and governance exposes millions of communal acres to risk.

That’s why the people, in Africa and around the globe, are so critical to the success of the Nature Conservancy’s Africa program. They are fighting to help local communities, governments and organizations conserve and enhance Africa’s vast array of shared natural resources.

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Film Screening, April13
Don’t miss the Texas premiere of The Hadza: Last of The First in the Houston Museum of Natural Science’ Wortham Giant Screen Theatre on April 13 at 6:30 p.m. This is a one-night-only screening with David Banks, director of the Nature Conservancy’s Africa program and the film’s producers. HMNS and Nature Conservancy members receive $5 off the regular ticket price. For advance tickets call 713.639.4629, click here or visit the HMNS Box Office.

Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 3/2-3/8

Bust out your planners, calendars, and PDAs (if you are throwback like that), it’s time to mark your calendars for the HMNS events of this week!  

science lecture
Lecture – Medicine Without Evolution Is Like Engineering Without Physics By Randolph M. Nesse

Tuesday, March 3
6:30 p.m.
Evolutionary medicine uses the basic science of evolutionary biology to improve the understanding, prevention andtreatment of disease. Instead of just asking how the body works and why it goes awry, it also asks why natural selection left us with so many traits like wisdom teeth and the narrow birth canal that leave us vulnerable to disease. The old answer-the limits of natural selection-is important, but there are five other important explanations for vulnerability. Randolph Nesse, a founder of the field evolutionary medicine, will give examples to illustrate all six reasons, with a focus on cancer, infectious diseases and emotional disorders. He will explain why the field is growing so fast, its prospects for providing a deeper understanding of disease, and how scientists and clinicians can join the effort to bring evolutionary biology to bear on the problems of medicine. This lecture is cosponsored by The Leakey Foundation.

Lecture – Great White Sharks, Tracking The Ocean’s Apex Predator By Greg Stunz
Wednesday, March 4
6:30 p.m. 
Through the OCEARCH collaborative, researchers are now generating previously unattainable data on the movement, biology and health of great white sharks in order to protect the specie³ future while enhancing public safety and education. Unprecedented research on great white sharks and other large apex predators will be presented by shark researcher Greg Stunz, Ph.D. of Harte Institute and Texas A&M Corpus Christi with OCEARCH founder and expedition leader Chris Fischer. This lecture is cosponsored by Rice University’s Glasscock School of Continuing Studies.

Mark Your Calendars for these events happening at HMNS 2/23-3/1

Bust out your planners, calendars, and PDAs (if you are throwback like that), it’s time to mark your calendars for the HMNS events of this week!  

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Lecture – The ABC’s Of Shark Research: Attacks, Biology And Conservation By Glenn Parsons
Wednesday, February 25
6:30 p.m.
Marine biologist Glenn R. Parsons, Ph.D., of Ole Miss will share the findings of his 40 years of researching shark behavior, ecology and physiology in the Gulf of Mexico, which harbors about 65 species of sharks. Sharks here are exposed to both natural stressors including changes in water temperature and oxygen availability and anthropognic stressors that are caused by humans, pollutants and fisheries for example. This lecture is cosponsored by Rice University’s Glasscock School of Continuing Studies.

 

Lecture – Pyramids, Mummies And Cleopatra: Recent Discoveries In Ancient Egypt By Zahi Hawass – SOLD OUT
Saturday, February 28
6:30 p.m.
Chronicling his adventures in archaeology, legendary Egyptologist and archaeologist Dr. Zahi Hawass will introduce the mystery of the Great Pyramids and Sphinx of Giza. He will discuss the discovery of the tombs of the pyramid builders which tells the story of the workmen who were involved in the massive construction projects, as well as the secret doors found inside the Great Pyramid of Khufu. Dr. Hawass will also share his theory on what may yet be uncovered inside the pyramid. One of Dr. Hawass’ recent endeavors has been the Egyptian Mummy Project, which uses modern forensic techniques, including CT scans and DNA analysis, to answer questions about human remains from ancient Egypt. The project has resulted in several crucial findings which he will share with us this evening, including identifications of the mummy of Queen Hatshepsut, new understandings about members of the family of Tutankhamun, and the death of King Tutankhamun. Finally, Dr. Hawass will discuss his current ongoing projects-the search for Queen Nefertiti and the tomb of Cleopatra and Mark Antony.

 

Book Signing – Discovering Tutankhamun: From Howard Carter To DNA By Dr. Zahi Hawass
Saturday, February 28
8:00 p.m.
Copies of “Discovering Tutankhamun: From Howard Carter to DNA” by Dr. Zahi Hawass will be sold at $49 plus tax. Book signing will follow Dr. Hawass’ 6:30 p.m lecture . 

Sharks are now oversharing…but you will want to follow them!

half-mount2-blogYoung or old, nature lover or couch potato—everyone has some fascination with sharks.

HMNS is bringing in some great opportunities to learn about these predators who have dominated the oceans for millions of years. Leading shark researchers will be at HMNS during the next two weeks to share the latest information on our local sharks in the Gulf of Mexico and the grand-daddy of them all, the great white.

On February 25 marine biologist Dr. Glenn Parsons from Ole Miss will share the findings of his 40-year career of researching shark behavior, ecology and physiology in the Gulf of Mexico, which harbors about 65 species of sharks. Sharks here are exposed to both natural stressors including changes in water temperature and oxygen availability and anthropogenic stressors that are caused by humans, pollutants and fisheries.

This is Katherine getting her and tag checkup aboard the OCEARCH vessel.

This is Katherine getting an ultrasound and tag checkup aboard the OCEARCH vessel.

Unprecedented research on great white sharks and other large apex predators will be presented by shark researcher Dr. Greg Stunz of the Harte Institute and Texas A&M Corpus Christi with OCEARCH founder and expedition leader Chris Fischer on March 4. In order to protect the species’ future while enhancing public safety and education, researchers with the OCEARCH collaborative are now generating previously unattainable data on the movement, biology and health of great white sharks. The images they will show on the Wortham Giant Screen will be insanely amazing.

Of course you can also get up close and personal with two different shark species at the Museum in the Shark! touch tank experience, where biologists will share shark tales and shark tails.

HMNS Distinguished Lectures

“The ABC’s of Sharks: Attacks, Biology and Conservation
Glenn Parsons, Ph.D., Ole Miss
Wednesday, February 25, 6:30 p.m.

“Great White Sharks, Tracking The Ocean’s Apex Predator”
Greg Stunz, Ph.D. and Chris Fischer, OCEARCH
Wednesday, March 4, 6:30 p.m.

Tickets & more info: www.hmns.org/lectures


Need to keep up with a busy shark who is always on the go?
Now you can stay connected to your favorite shark via a phone app, Twitter and Facebook!

shark-tracker-app-iconOCEARCH’s Global Shark Tracker app lets you observe the navigational pattern of sharks that have been tagged with satellite tracking technology all for the purpose of shark conservation.

OCEARCH facilitates unprecedented research by supporting leading researchers and institutions seeking to attain groundbreaking data on the biology and health of sharks, in conjunction with basic research on shark life history and migration.

OCEARCH is a leader in open source research, sharing data in near-real time for free through the Global Shark Tracker, enabling students and the public to learn alongside PhDs. The Landry’s-developed STEM Education Curriculum, based on the Global Shark Tracker and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), is being launched for grades 6-8 in the fall of 2013 nationwide.

Over 50 researchers from more than 20 institutions have collaborated with OCEARCH to date with over three dozen research papers in process or completed. Research expeditions are conducted worldwide aboard the M/V OCEARCH, which serves as both a mothership and at-sea laboratory. Utilizing a custom 75,000 lb. capacity hydraulic platform designed to safely lift mature sharks for access by a multi-disciplined research team, up to 12 studies are conducted in approximately 15 minutes on a live mature shark. Powered by five Cat engines, the M/V OCEARCH is capable of Global Circumnavigation.

Here are screenshots showing the favorite hangouts of Wyatt, Sam Houston and Madeline—a few sharks in our neighborhood. 

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