About Vincent

Vincent is the Copywriter at HMNS.

‘Tis The Season: Get 20% Off Select Designers from 12-4 at Today’s Holiday Trunk Show

Swipe and smile at the Museum store Trunk Shows, where we’re giving you exclusive access to unique designer jewelry at exclusive prices. Find original designs, sure to be the perfect gift — all at 20 percent off (plus member discounts).

Museum Store Holiday Trunk Show

Jewelry by Mirta Tummino

As a part of our Holiday Trunk Shows, this week we’re featuring designers Mirta Tummino and Sarah Stewart.

Houston favorite Mirta Tummino’s delicate wirework showcases colorful gemstones, showing us the meaning of elegance through her understated yet captivating designs. Sarah Stewart designs beautiful silk and wool scarves that are batiked and woven in Indonesian by master textile artists, with beautiful attention to detail.

Come See us in the Museum Store today for great deals on great gifts! 

And don’t forget to check out the Museum Store online for great gift ideas.  We’ve got everything for jewelry lovers, geeky connoisseurs, science loving kiddos and everyone in between. Order by December 16 to guarantee shipment by Christmas Day!

Museum Store Holiday Trunk Show

Jewelry by Mirta Tummino

Museum store Holiday Trunk Show

Scarf by Sarah Stewart

Museum Store Holiday Trunk Show

Jewelry by Mirta Tummino

Museum Store Holiday Trunk Show

Scarf by Sarah Stewart

 

 

 

Seeing Stars with James Wooten: A solstice and a shower for December

This star map shows the Houston sky at 9 pm CST on December 1, 8 pm CST on December 15, and dusk on December 31.  To use the map, put the direction you are facing at the bottom. The Summer Triangle sets in the west.  This consists of the brightest stars in Cygnus, Lyra, and Aquila.  Mars outshines all the dim stars in the southwest.   Pegasus, the Flying Horse, is high in the south.  To the east, we see Orion, the Hunter, and Taurus, the Bull, finally entering the sky.  The brilliant stars of winter began their grand entry.

This star map shows the Houston sky at 9 pm CST on December 1, 8 pm CST on December 15, and dusk on December 31. To use the map, put the direction you are facing at the bottom.
The Summer Triangle sets in the west. This consists of the brightest stars in Cygnus, Lyra, and Aquila. Mars outshines all the dim stars in the southwest. Pegasus, the Flying Horse, is high in the south. To the east, we see Orion, the Hunter, and Taurus, the Bull, finally entering the sky. The brilliant stars of winter began their grand entry.

This month, Mars remains in the southwest at dusk this month as it moves through Capricornus. Mars continues to fade a little each night as Earth continues to leave it farther behind. 

Jupiter is now high in the south at dawn; it is the brightest thing there. 

Venus begins to emerge from the Sun’s glare late this month. Can you spot it low in the southwest at dusk by New Year’s Eve?

Saturn begins to emerge into the morning sky by mid-month. Look low in the southeast at dawn.

In December, the Big Dipper is below the horizon at dusk. As the Big Dipper sets, though, Cassiopeia is high above the North Star. This is a pattern of five stars in a distinct M or W shape. Look for Cassiopeia high in the north on fall and winter evenings.  

The Summer Triangle sets in the west.  Watch for the Great Square of Pegasus almost overhead at dusk now and in the west by Christmas. Taurus, the Bull rises in the east.  Look for the Pleiades star cluster above reddish Aldebaran. Dazzling Orion, the Hunter rises shortly after dusk (by month’s end, it is already up at dusk). As Orion enters the evening sky, we transition from the relatively dim evening skies of autumn to the brilliant stars of winter. We are beginning to face away from the center of the galaxy, looking at stars behind us in our own part (the Orion Spur) of our galaxy.

Moon Phases in December 2014:

Full: December 6, 11:26 am
Last Quarter: December 14, 11:53 am
New: December 22, 12:35 am
1st Quarter: December 28, 5:32 pm

At 10:03 pm on Sunday, December 21, the Sun is directly overhead at the Tropic of Capricorn, the farthest point south where this is possible. This puts the Sun as low as possible in our sky, and marks the winter solstice. In the Southern Hemisphere, the Sun is as high as possible in the sky—this is the summer solstice for them. 

Although the winter solstice is the shortest day, the earliest sunset occurred on about December 2, and the latest sunrise will occur January 10.

That’s because the Earth speeds up on its orbit as it approaches perihelion (closest approach to the Sun) next month. This acceleration shifts sunrise, local noon, and sunset slightly later each day this month and next. The effect is smaller than that of the Sun taking a lower path across the sky, which normally dominates in causing earlier sunsets and later sunrises. But the Sun’s apparent path varies very little near the solstice itself, allowing the secondary effect of the Earth approaching the Sun to predominate. For most people, then, (those who witness sunset but sleep through sunrise), days will seem to lengthen throughout December, although they don’t really begin lengthening until December 21.

The Geminid Meteor Shower peaks this month, as it does every December. Along with the Perseids in August, the Geminids are one of the two most reliable meteor showers, producing on average about 100 meteors per hour. 

The Geminids are unique among meteor showers because they are associated not with a comet but with an asteroid, 3200 Phaethon. This means that with Geminids, we see significant activity much earlier in the night than with other showers. Most meteor showers peak in the hours immediately before dawn. This is because what plows through the debris field is the leading edge of the Earth, and that’s the side going from night into day.  Since Phaethon is an asteroid, however, debris along its orbital path forms a shallower angle to Earth’s orbital path, meaning that we begin to face into the debris field as early as 9 or 10 pm. Meteors will seem to ‘radiate’ from the constellation Gemini, hence the name of the shower. However, they may appear anywhere in the sky. 

As always, you see more meteors the farther you are from big city lights which hide dimmer ones. Our George Observatory will be open from 5pm to midnight Saturday night, December 13 for observing this meteor shower. Midnight is about when the Moon, approaching last quarter phase, will rise.

Click here for the Burke baker Planetarium Schedule.

On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory, you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer.  If you’re there, listen for my announcement. 

Clear Skies!

 

Educator How-To: How to Make Your Own Pet Squid

The days just after Thanksgiving are always busy at the Museum. There are flurries of children on field trips, shoppers looking for that unusual and prefect gift and, my favorite, the annual installation of the holiday trees in the grand hall. The trees, which are decorated by local area non-profits, celebrate a variety of themes and causes and are not to be missed. My particular favorite each year is the tree decorated by the Houston Conchology Society. My department also gets to decorate a tree and it is always an ode to science. This year’s theme: Cephalopod Christmas. How can you go wrong there?

We know you will be out to visit the trees this year, and we assumed that you would want a cephalopod for yourself so I whipped up this little tutorial for your very own pet squid.  He’s adorable. He’s a cephalopod. Most importantly, he doesn’t have to be fed, walked* or cleaned up after. 

(*You might look really awkward trying to take your cephalopod for a walk.)

Ed How To - Squid 1

Materials:

1 Paper towel tube
1 Toilet paper tube
Paint – color of your choice
Paint brush
Scissors
String, yarn or thin ribbon – 2 to 3 feet.
Tape
Straw
Glue
Black permanent marker
Stapler

Procedure:

  1. Color your tubes with the paint of your choice. (Don’t clean up the paint quite yet. You’ll need it again in a minute.)
    Ed How To - Squid 2
  2. Set the tubes aside and let them dry.
  3. Pinch one end of the toilet paper tube shut.
    Ed How To - Squid 3
  4. Use scissors to cut a 45 degree angle off each side of the tube so you now have two triangle pieces and a pointy tube.
    Ed How To - Squid 4
  5. Use a stapler to keep the tube flat. I aligned my staple with the length of the tube so as to not get in the way of the next step.
    Ed How To - Squid 5
  6. Use the scissors to cut 8 legs from the paper towel tubes. The legs should go up the tube about 2/3 of the way.
  7. Use the rest of the paint to color the pieces you cut off – both sides and the inside of the legs you just cut. The legs may get a little floppy when they are wet with paint, but don’t worry – they’ll firm up when dry. If you have some weird delaminated bits, you can always add a little bit of glue.
    Ed How To - Squid 6
  8. Once everything is dry, cut one of the triangle pieces down the fold so you have two pieces. Cut the other triangle piece into two feeding tentacle pads.
    Ed How To - Squid 7
  9. You are going to use the halved triangle pieces to make the fins of your squid. Apply a little bit of glue to the hypotenuse of the two triangles (opposite the 90 degree angle) and slide them in between the two pointy bits of the toilet paper tube – one on each side.  The 90 degree angle should be the part sticking out and making the fin.
    Ed How To - Squid 8Ed How To - Squid 9
  10. Now grab the paper towel tube. Use the scissors to shape the legs as you see fit. I like mine a little bit more realistic but, really, you can leave them as is.
  11. If you so choose, you can also curl or shape the legs for more realistic appearance. For mine, I did this by rolling the legs over a round marker – switching from the inside of the leg to the outside of the leg every so often.
  12. Now, glue the feeding tentacles to the string. You can also staple or tape them on as you see fit. Go crazy.
    Ed How To - Squid 10
  13. Tie the middle of the string into a small knot. This will give you a little bit more material when you attach the feeding tentacles.
    Ed How To - Squid 11
  14. Holding onto the knot, drop the feeding tentacles down through the uncut end of the paper towel tube.
    Ed How To - Squid 12
  15. Staple, glue or tape the end of the knot to the edge of the paper towel tube to secure it in place.
    Ed How To - Squid 13
  16. Cut a 2 ½” to 3” slit in the uncut end of the paper towel tube. This will allow you to overlap these edges and fit the “legs” into the “head”.
    Ed How To - Squid 14
  17. Now let’s make a siphon. Cut a straw slightly longer than your slit. Let’s say 3 ¼” just for fun.
  18. Flatten the straw a bit and then attach the straw to one of the edges of the slit you just made.
    Ed How To - Squid 15
  19. Curl the side of the slit without the straw behind the side of the slit with the straw. Then, fit the “legs” into the “head.  Push it all the way in.
    Ed How To - Squid 16
  20. Once you know it fits, take the “legs” out, put a little glue on the top edge and fit it back into the “head”.
    Ed How To - Squid 17Ed How To - Squid 18
  21. Last step! We need to add some eyes! Using your black permanent marker, make two dime sized circles on your guy on the “leg” piece between the “head” and the legs.  They should line up approximately with your fins.
    Ed How To - Squid 19
  22. Done! Enjoy your pet squid and take him on lots of walks to the park.  Squid love going on walks. Here’s the final product.I have named him Maurice.
    Ed How To - Squid 1

 

Seeing Stars with James Wooten: Come out to the George for Astronomy Day November 8!

This star map shows the Houston sky at 8 pm CDT on November 1, 7 pm CST on November 15, and dusk on November 30.  To use the map, put the direction you are facing at the bottom. The Summer Triangle is high in the west.  This consists of the brightest stars in Cygnus, Lyra, and Aquila.  The ‘teapot’ of Sagittarius sets in the southwest, with Mars to its left.   Pegasus, the Flying Horse, is high in the east.  To the south and east, we see a vast dim area of stars known as the ‘Celestial Sea’, where only Fomalhaut stands out.

This star map shows the Houston sky at 8 pm CDT on November 1, 7 pm CST on November 15, and dusk on November 30. To use the map, put the direction you are facing at the bottom.
The Summer Triangle is high in the west. This consists of the brightest stars in Cygnus, Lyra, and Aquila. The ‘teapot’ of Sagittarius sets in the southwest, with Mars to its left. Pegasus, the Flying Horse, is high in the east. To the south and east, we see a vast dim area of stars known as the ‘Celestial Sea’, where only Fomalhaut stands out.

This month, Mars remains in the southwest at dusk this month as it pulls away from the teapot of Sagittarius. Mars continues to fade a little each night as Earth continues to leave it farther behind

Jupiter is now higher in the east at dawn; it is the brightest thing there. 

Venus is passing behind the Sun and thus out of sight this month. Superior conjunction (Venus in line with the Sun, on the far side of the Sun) was on October 25.

Saturn is also out of sight behind the Sun this month. Conjunction with the Sun is on November 18.

The Summer Triangle now shifts towards the west as the Great Square of Pegasus appears higher, approaching the zenith. As the autumn ‘intermission’ in between the bright stars of summer and winter continues, Houstonians with a clear southern horizon can try to find a star that few Americans get to see. Due south and very low to the horizon at about 10:00 pm in mid-November is Achernar, 9th brightest star in the sky. It marks the end of the river Eridanus, one of the dim watery patterns that fill the southern autumn sky. If you can find it, Achernar will seem of average brightness because it is shining through so much air. Still, it is a good way to remind yourself that the stars we see depend on our latitude, and that the sky on the Gulf Coast is similar to, but not the same as, what most Americans see. 

Moon Phases in November 2014:
Full: November 6, 4:22 pm
Last Quarter: November 14, 9:17 am
New: November 22, 6:31 am
1st Quarter: November 29, 4:06 am

Our annual Astronomy Day at the George Observatory is this Saturday, November 8!  On Astronomy Day we have activities from 3-10 pm, and all of the telescopes, even the ones that normally cost $5 to look through, are free.  What’s more, the weather looks just great so far!  Surf to www.astronomyday.net for more information.

Click here for the Burke Baker Planetarium Schedule.

On clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory, you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer. If you’re there, listen for my announcement.