About Kelsey

Kelsey started working at the Museum through Xplorations summer camp, and this fall she started working as a programs facilitator. She is a presenter for several outreach programs, assists with overnight programs, and assists with education collections during summer camp. Her favorite dinosaur is a Triceratops found at HMNS Sugar Land. The Triceratops is also named "Kelsey."

Girls take home STEM prizes at annual GEMS event!

Two weeks ago, we celebrated our annual Girls Exploring Math and Science (GEMS) public event! We had an amazing turnout from local STEM organizations presenting fun activities and demonstrations for kids of all ages. They also helped us find our top three student projects! These projects were presented at booths by students in middle school and high school. We had many amazing projects, and it was unfortunate we could only choose three winners! We’re proud to present the top three student projects.

3rd place winners

In third place, we have a group of high school students from the Jersey Village robotics team, Jersey Voltage. Their project entitled “Up, Up & Robots Away!” focused on the robot the group built in just six weeks. The robot was programmed to pick up and stack boxes more than six feet high. They hope to use their winnings to fund parts for their robot and their entry into robotics competitions.

2nd place winners

Our second place group presented a project called “Fun with Fizix,” which discussed several areas of physics. This group of girls from Awty International School demonstrated Bernoulli’s principle, as well as surface area and conservation of energy. They’d like to use their winnings to go on a field trip to see physics in action!

First Place Winners

Finally, we’d like to introduce our first place winners! The group of girls from Girl Scout Troop 21276 presented a project about genetically modified organisms called “GMOs: The New Revolution of Food.” They experimented growing different varieties of food to determine the effectiveness of GMO produce and food. The group created a model that described how genetically modified rice could last longer during the wet season than non-genetically modified rice. They plan to use the grand prize winning for the T.H. Rogers science program and perhaps a Night at the Museum!

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Thank you for coming out to GEMS 2016! If you’d like to participate next year, please email gems@hmns.org for more information. Join us at next year’s GEMS event on February 18, 2017! 

 

This Saturday, The Educator Event gives teachers a look at Houston museums

The Educator Event @HMNS is an exclusive event for all educators including student teachers, administrators, education undergraduate and graduate students, and home school educators. Join us Saturday, Jan. 23 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. for a free day at the museum featuring educational workshops and the opportunity to earn three hours of CPE credit. Workshops will be presented by the Houston Museum of Natural Science as well as other local museums and educational institutions. Workshops will cover several subject areas from science to history to art! San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site presents a workshop on how the Battle of San Jacinto was a turning point in Texas history. Explore the Hoover Dam with NRG Energy and create your own pocket book with The Printing Museum. Check out all 14 workshops in our event program to plan out your day!

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Discover field trips, outreach programs and teacher workshops that cater to your needs! There will be representatives from multiple organizations offering curriculum, field trip ideas, and activities for your subject. Get your students to interact with Texas history by visiting the Houston Heritage Society table and discovering their historical field trips.  Discover the geometry of a baseball field by talking to Minute Maid Park Tours about their TEKS-aligned programming. For a truly unique experience with biology and history, talk to the National Museum of Funeral History about their History of Embalming exhibit. Come see these organizations and more to discover how to create an experience your students will never forget!

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Registration is still open. Sign up today at www.hmns.org/educatorevent.

Color and Create for the Secret Ocean Art Contest!

The bright colors of life on the coral reef inspire artists all over the globe. How well does your art measure up? Show off your talent through the Secret Ocean Art Contest, and you could win free museum tickets and an artist feature on the big screen! Check out some of our ideas below and learn how to enter the contest before the Sept. 25 deadline.

In the saltwater world captured in Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Secret Ocean 3Dwe see many animals with bright colors and vibrant patterns, and struggle to find some of the animals hiding in plain sight. Coloration plays an important role to survival in most environments. Animals with appropriate coloration can be better at confusing predators, attracting mates, or blending in to catch the next meal. Every animal has its own approach to coloration, and they each use it for more than just beauty.

Dangerous distraction

The lionfish is known for its large elegant fins and the impressive venomous spines along its back, but the red-striped pattern of the lionfish makes it a fierce predator at the top of its food chain. The lionfish does not use its venomous spines to capture prey. The venom is meant to protect the lionfish from other predators, and it is quite successful! The bright pattern on its body warns predators that the lionfish is venomous. Its warning coloration may be the reason there are no known predators for the lionfish that were introduced into the Caribbean.

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Flickr Creative Commons.

Bright beauty

The clownfish is also known for its distinct color pattern. Unlike the lionfish, clownfish coloration does not serve as a warning. Rather, it helps them avoid predation. The white stripes break up the body of the clownfish making it harder for another animal to see. Using stripes and spots in this manner is called disruptive coloration. The disruptive coloration on the clownfish can confuse a predator for just enough time and allow the clownfish to retreat safely into its anemone.

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Flickr Creative Commons.

Clever camouflage

One of the best color patterns for animals is one that goes unnoticed entirely. It’s hard to catch an animal that you cannot find. The octopus is well known for its ability to change the color and texture of its skin to blend into its surroundings. This camouflage can help the animal escape predators as well as sneak up on unassuming prey. An octopus can also mimic rocks, algae and even coconuts to blend in to all sorts of environments.

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Flickr Creative Commons.

Now, combine your artistic talent with your knowledge of coloration for our contest! To compete, print out a copy of the rules and the Secret Ocean art contest template, then create your masterpiece. You can use paint, crayons, sand, glitter, beads and almost anything you can think of to create a fish or octopus. Don’t forget to submit before the deadline, Sept. 25! The top pieces will win great prizes like tickets to the HMNS permanent exhibit halls or to a showing of Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Secret Ocean 3D at the Wortham Giant Screen Theatre. Your artwork could also be projected onto the big screen!

Give us your best shot! We’re looking forward to your colorful creations. Best of luck!

Sam Lam: Legacy Camper

Once in a while, the Houston Museum of Natural Science Xplorations program gives children so much enthusiasm about science that they never really leave the museum. Sam Lam discovered the museum as a child with the Xplorations program, and has since never missed a summer at the museum. She now teaches some of the same summer camps she enjoyed when she was a kid.

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HMNS: When did you start attending summer camp here? And why?

SL: I started attending camps at HMNS when I was 6 or 7 years old, around 1998. My mom worked downtown and decided to look into sending us to camp at HMNS. After just one week, I was hooked. From that point on, I kept pestering her to sign me up for Xplorations year after year. 

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HMNS: What was your favorite class? What made it your favorite? Any stories from that class?

SL: My favorite class was Wizard Science Academy. Reading Harry Potter was a big part of my childhood, so it was very exciting to be able to attend a summer camp that incorporated science with a Hogwarts twist! I still remember dissecting an owl pellet and being convinced it was from Hedwig. I remember having Nicole Temple as my teacher and being so excited that she secretly let me switch out of the house that the Sorting Hat chose for me into the house of my choice.

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HMNS: What is your favorite memory from summer camp?

SL: I took a camp called, “Thrills, Chills, and Disasters” that talked all about physics and the science behind amusement parks. As an end-of-the-week field trip that wrapped up all our learning, we were able to go to Astroworld to see the physics in action. I loved going around and riding rides with all of my camp friends. It was such a unique opportunity that I am lucky to have had!

HMNS: If you could go back to Xplorations Summer Camp for one week this summer, what class would you take and why?

SL: I would definitely sign up for Bedazzled! I have had the best time teaching that camp for the past few years. I think the best part of Bedazzled is the Spa Day on Friday when campers get to dress as comfortable as they’d like and pamper themselves for the day. A day with magnetic nail polish and a nice, relaxing mud mask? Sign me up! 

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HMNS: What made you decide to come back and work at HMNS?

SL: When I was a camper, the Xplorations staff was always so enthusiastic and fun to be around. Because of them, I never wanted to leave camp when my mom came to pick me up. I wanted to keep the fun going and stay with them. When I officially “aged-out” of camp, I knew I wanted to come back and make camp a positive experience for others, just like the staff did for me.

HMNS: How did the Xplorations Summer Camp influence your life?

SL: During the summers, HMNS has been my second home for as long as I can remember and the people I have met there have become like another family to me. Some of the best friendships I have are with people I have met through Xplorations. Thanks to Xplorations and its amazing staff, I was able to meet and teach with fantastic teachers who inspired me to become a teacher myself. The best part of Xplorations Summer Camp is the people you meet—from the awesome campers, to the fun-loving TA’s and teachers, and the always cheerful and helpful education staff. My best memories from camp are because of them.