About Jennifer

Jennifer is the Divisional Merchandise Manager for the Museum Stores.

HMNS Winter Trend Report: La Virgen de Guadalupe

Sourcing product for special exhibits is one of the favorite things about my job, but as a lover of Mexican art and culture, La Virgen de Guadalupe: Empress of the Americas has been especially fun.

This summer, we traveled to Mexico City and met with officials at the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe. The ancient basilica and chapels are beautiful, and seeing the art, both fine and folk, in context punctuated how meaningful the Virgin has been to so many lives and how integral she is to the culture.

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Capilla del Pocito – Chapel of the Little Well.

With this in mind, we met with the Basilica’s retail director and chose some very special items to bring to the museum’s store. These rose petal rosaries made by nuns are deeply scented.

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Scented rosaries made by nuns.

Our talented Creative Director, Kim Bloedorn, designed our beautiful souvenirs including mugs, refrigerator magnets, 3D postcards, bookmarks and more, featuring Her image surrounded by roses.

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Graphic design by HMNS Creative Director Kim Bloedorn.

Rising young artist Felipe Gonzalez Aguilera, AKA Ferguz, is rapidly gaining a reputation for his sensitive portraiture of iconic figures. One of Ferguz’s compelling paintings of the Virgin will be in the exhibit on loan from a private collector. We had the opportunity to visit the artist in his studio and were able to commission some paintings the he created especially for the store. The photos do not do justice to the delicate colors and brushstrokes.

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Fine art by Felipe Gonzalez Aguilera, AKA Ferguz.

Mexico is known for its vibrant folk art and traditional craftwork. Detailed, hand-painted and punched tin nichos from San Miguel de Allende highlight images of the Virgin.

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Nicho by San Miguel de Allende.

Traditional, brightly-embroidered blouses are from artisans in Oaxaca, Puebla, and Hidalgo.

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Itzel white blouse.

Weaving has been a part of the culture and livelihood of the Zapotec people since about 5000 B.C. The Spanish conquest introduced wool fiber and the standing loom and the weaving process and designs have changed little to this day. Ancient art meets contemporary design in these handmade purses.

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Zapotec tote.

Closer to home, I worked with local designer Rebecca Lankford to create a series of rosary-inspired necklaces. Rebecca’s faith is a large influence on her work and she was delighted to create jewelry that references how religion and design have been intertwined since humans first created art.

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Ruby rosary necklace by Rebecca Lankford.

We have more handicrafts, souvenirs and art available in-store and online at museumstore.hmns.org. All proceeds from store sales go back to the museum and enable us to create these unique exhibits and educational programs.

The Art of the Skull: Museum Store highlights the beauty of the human skeleton

One of the most photographed pieces in the museum’s collections is the “jaw dropping” crystal quartz skull in the exhibit Gemstone Carvings: Masterworks by Harold Van Pelt.  The hollow, life-sized skull with articulated jaw, was carved from a single block of rare izoklakeite quartz.

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Harold van Pelt’s quartz skull.

Our fascination with human skulls spans cultures and eras. From the Neolithic plaster-covered skulls of Jericho, the ornate Buddhist kapala skull cups, European vanitas morality paintings, Mexico’s Dia de los Muertos festivals, and all the way up to modern works of art from people like Damien Hirst, the skull represents our views about mortality and humanity.

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Vanitas Still Life. 1648, Jan Jansz. Treck.

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Click photo to open ShopHMNS Instagram.

The European Enlightenment period led to an interest in natural history, anatomy, and archaeology, and gentlemen’s cabinets of curiosities often included a collection of skulls, both animal and human. While these early wunderkammer were more about collecting the unusual and “wonderful” rather than scholarly study, they were the precursor to our modern natural history museums.

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Click photo to see product in the Museum Store.

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Click photo to open ShopHMNS Instagram.

Here in the Museum Store, we’re still fascinated with collecting skull art and imagery. One of our favorite items is the intricately beaded skull necklaces from local artist team Brassthread. Inspired by Huichol beadwork and Dia de los Muertos folk art, the tiny handmade skull is painstakingly set with miniscule beads in an intricate pattern.

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While not an original Van Pelt carving, this labradorite skull was hand carved in Madagascar from a solid block of labradorite, and flashes light and rich colors from different angles.

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Reminiscent of momento mori and Victorian headstone carvings, f. is for frank’s cast pewter skull ring is the work of Texas sculptors Shoshannah Frank and Casey Melton.

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Our newest artist is Ashley Lyons of New Orlean’s Porter Lyons. Her Voodoo collection pays homage to the history and customs behind the religion that was so much a part of New Orleans Creole culture. Her Baron Samedi earrings reference the loa who is the spirit of both death and resurrection.

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There is beauty and art in science, as shown by x-ray artist Hugh Turvey. Turvey uses industrial x-rays to photograph not just skeletons, but also the “bones” of everyday objects. Designer Michael Revil Madjus also captures the beauty of the human skull with his x-ray pillow.

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We love to see the natural world transformed into art, so even if skulls and skeletons aren’t your thing, we have intriguing items from a wide range of artists and designers, both in store and online at museumstore.hmns.org. And 100% of store proceeds benefits the museum and its educational programming. #ChillsAtHMNS

Handpicked gems meet gold vermeil at Tummino’s Trunk Show

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Native Texan Mirta Tummino discovered her talent for jewelry design while working for a Fortune 500 company in Chicago. Her part-time design and metalsmithing studies at the Lillstreet Art Center quickly became a passion when she started selling her one-of-a-kind designs in Chicago area boutiques.

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Lariat necklace, multiple gems.

As demand grew, Mirta was able to fulfill her true calling and become a full-time artist. Moving back to her native Houston opened new opportunities for her collection and she soon realized her colorful gemstone jewels were a perfect fit for the museum with the world’s finest gem and mineral collection.

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Handpicking her stones, Mirta complements classic gems like aquamarine, labradorite, and blue topaz with the less common kyanite, Russian amazonite, and black opal. Each stone is delicately wire-wrapped in sterling or gold vermeil to create an intricately precise bezel.

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Amazonite necklace.

Mirta will make an artist appearance Friday, Aug. 7, from 10 to 4 p.m at the Houston Museum of Natural Science Museum Store. The entire Mirta Tummino collection will be 20% off the day of the show, plus membership discounts.

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Feel good about looking great knowing that 100% of museum store and trunk show proceeds benefits HMNS’ educational programs.

Trunk Show features Masterson’s coveted glass art jewelry

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Houstonian Mariquita Masterson has always had the eye of an artist. Thirty years ago, Mariquita was commissioned to design a glass table setting for an art gala. Working with the glass blower, she became fascinated with the chunks and shards of colorful glass and imagined the pieces set as jewelry. Fast forward three decades, and Mariquita’s hand-blown jewels have become a coveted status symbol within the Texas social scene.

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Extending her artistic skills beyond her jewelry line, Mariquita has designed a stained glass window for the chapel at Houston’s non-profit Amazing Place adult wellness center and created an iconic necklace for the Absolut Artists advertising campaign.

ABSOLUT ARTIST Mariquita Masterson

While Mariquita’s designs are immediately recognizable, each piece of glass is one-of-a-kind as they are blown and slumped by hand from recycled materials. The glass is then hand set in custom sterling silver or gold vermeil settings.mariquita masterson ring grp

The incredible color selection of Mariquita Masterson’s glass will be on display July 24, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. All pieces will be 20% off the day of the show in addition to member discounts.

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Feel good about looking great knowing that 100% of Museum Store and Trunk Show proceeds benefits HMNS’ educational programs.