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Archaeopteryx has arrived in Sugar Land!

Last week a version of the show 'Archaeopteryx: Icon of Evolution' arrived at the Houston Museum of Natural Science at Sugar Land.  There are around 70 authentic fossils on display including the Geosaurs, Guitar Fish, several fossilized corals, insects, fish, plants and a cast of the Thermopolis Archaeoptertyx. Check out the HMNS exhibit in Focus On: The Thermopolis Archaeopteryx [Pete Larson] from HMNS on Vimeo. There have been lots of posts in the past year on the Archaeopteryx show here on the blog so take…

Archaeopteryx – The Fossil that Proved Darwin was Right

1859: Charles Darwin published “On the Origin of Species.” Other scientists had proposed evolutionary theories before but Darwin was the first to work up a detailed case of how natural processes could transform one species into another. Darwin claimed that even Classes could change - for example, the Class Reptilia could evolve into the Bird Class Aves. “Where is the fossil proof??” exclaimed doubters. “Where is a transitional fossil that links one Class with another?” The absence of missing links…

Archaeopteryx and Friends

Archaeopteryx and Friends A virtual visit to a Jurassic wild animal preserve By Neal Immega, Paleontologist Is it a bird? or a dinosaur? Archy is both. We have the best-preserved Archaeopteryx on display in our basement and you can see all sorts of significant evolutionary developments such as a semi-lunate metacarpel in the wrist, hallux to the side, elongate tail, furcula, a large second digit claw on the hand, a sternum without a keel and all sorts of other highly abstract features…

How To Stuff Your Archaeopteryx For Thanksgiving

Serves 1/20th of a person. You must become pubis-savvy to understand Archaeopteryx. The pubic bone commands the guts - and gut evolution was huge in bird origins. 1) Check out an allosaur, a typical big meat-eating dinosaur. Note that the pubic bone points down. This position limits the size of the guts because the intestines must stop in front of the pubis. 2) Check out a chicken, a typical modern bird. The pubis has been pulled way back so it points backwards.…

HMNS at Hermann Park

5555 Hermann Park Dr.
Houston,Texas 77030
(713) 639-4629


Get Directions Offering varies by location
HMNS at Sugar Land

13016 University Blvd.
Sugar Land, Texas 77479
(281) 313-2277


Get Directions Offering varies by location
George Observatory

21901 FM 762 Rd.
Needville, Texas 77461
(281) 242-3055

Hours
Tuesday - Saturday By Reservation
Saturdays 3:00PM - 10:00PM
Saturdays (DST) 3:00PM - 11:00PM
DST = Daylight Savings Time.
Please call for holiday hours. Entry to Brazos Bend State Park ends at 9:30 p.m. daily
Get Directions Offering varies by location

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