Meet Chris Fischer from Ocearch today at HMNS!

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Today at HMNS – meet Chris Fischer, Founding Chairman and Expedition Leader for OCEARCH who will be here today at the opening of our new special exhibition Shark!

Event Details:
Friday, August 29
2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Glassell Hall in front of Shark! exhibit

Tickets:
FREE for members
Non-Members: Included with purchase of a ticket to our permanent exhibit halls.

About Chris Fischer:
Chris Fischer is the Founding Chairman and Expedition Leader for OCEARCH. Since 2007, he has led 20 global expeditions to advance science and education while unlocking the many mysteries surrounding the life history of white sharks and other giants of the ocean. He has facilitated millions of dollars in collaborative ocean research, supporting the work of over 70 scientists from more than 40 international and regional institutions, through his own financial resources and with the support of partners such as title sponsor Caterpillar Inc. Additional support comes from films sponsor Costa Sunglasses, Education Development partner Landry’s Inc., philanthropists and foundations, and the general public who make contributions through Rally.org.

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His work with OCEARCH has been aired on the National Geographic Channel and HISTORY in over 170 countries and has been documented in over 7,500 global media stories. The work, ranging from satellite tracking to biological studies is helping generate critical data required to better understand the health of our oceans by understanding the health of its apex predators. Fischer is an award-winning member of the Explorer’s Club with 10 flagged expeditions. His collaborative open-sourced approach has generated over 50 scientific papers in process to advance ocean sustainability through data-driven public policy while simultaneously advancing public safety and education.

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Chris’ ultimate goal is to explode the body of knowledge forward by enabling scientists and governments around the globe to generate groundbreaking data on the ocean’s apex predators in an open source environment. He’s also conceived a way to advance STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) education through a free, dynamic shark-based OCEARCH K-12 curriculum available at OCEARCH.org, home of the Global Shark Tracker – which is also available as an iPhone and Android App.

Come to the Dark Side: Distinguished Lecture Explores Dark Matter

The ordinary atoms that make up the known universe — from our bodies and the air we breathe to the planets and stars — constitute only 5 percent of all matter and energy in the cosmos. The rest is known as dark matter and dark energy, because their precise identities are unknown. 

Dr. Katherine Freese, one of today’s foremost pioneers in the study of dark matter, is a key player in the epic quest to solve one of the most compelling enigmas of modern science: What is the universe made of?

This dynamo researcher, speaker and author will be at the Houston Museum of Natural Science on September 4 for a lecture on her work on the front lines of dark matter research.

Blending cutting-edge science with her own behind-the-scenes insights as a leading researcher in the field, acclaimed theoretical physicist Katherine Freese will recount the hunt for dark matter, from the discoveries of visionary scientists like Fritz Zwicky — the Swiss astronomer who coined the term “dark matter” in 1933 — to the deluge of data today from underground laboratories, satellites in space and the Large Hadron Collider.

Theorists contend that dark matter consists of fundamental particles known as WIMPs —or weakly interacting massive particles. Billions of them pass through our bodies every second without us even realizing it, yet their gravitational pull is capable of whirling stars and gas at breakneck speeds around the centers of galaxies and bending light from distant objects.

Many cosmologists believe we are on the verge of solving the mystery! Freese will help even the non-science majors be able to fathom this epochal moment in humankind’s quest to understand the universe.

Katherine Freese of the University of Michigan splits her time between Ann Arbor and New York City, and is also member of the International Advisory Board for the Oskar Klein Center for Cosmoparticle Physics in Stockholm, Sweden.

HMNS Distinguished Lecture
Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter
Katherine Freese, Ph.D., University of Michigan
Wednesday, September 3, 6:30 p.m.

Following the lecture, Dr. Freese will sign copies of her new book The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter, which provides the foundation needed to fully fathom humankind’s quest to understand the universe.

Book signing is in partnership with River Oaks Bookstore.

And, save the date for our next Dark Matter program…
Film Screening – Particle Fever
Thursday, October 9, 6:00 p.m.

10,000 scientists from over 100 countries who have joined forces in pursuit of explaining the origin of all matter. Join Dr. Paul Padley, professor at Rice University and member of the Hadron Collider team, for this is a one-night-only event at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

For advance tickets to both events, call 713.639.4629 or visit www.hmns.org/lectures

‘What’s wood glue doing there?’ Connecting the dots to repair an ancient join

Hello again, and welcome to the third post in my series on the conservation of a Third-Intermediate-Period coffin lid at the Michael C. Carlos Museum.

As our team in the lab has seen, many times repairs of ancient objects are not well-informed or sensitive to delicate surfaces and structures. In the case of this coffin lid, this can not only disrupt our appreciation, but also our interpretation of the material.

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While examining the back of the object, it was clear to my supervisor, Renée Stein, and myself that the surface had been coated in a thick layer of wood glue (yes, the type of stuff you can buy at the Home Depot).

It wasn’t clear just how extensive this coating was until we interrogated the construction of the object. How were the many wooden boards put together? What does this tell us about the object original appearance? Were the structures stable after 3,000 years?

As we asked ourselves these questions, we also noticed something else that wasn’t quite right: The two scarph joins at either shoulder were not symmetrical, and we were wondering why…

A view of the scarph joins in question, with the correct orientation circled in purple and the troublesome example in green.

A view of the scarph joins in question, with the correct orientation circled in purple and the troublesome example in green.

 

A close up of the join in question.

A close up of the join in question.

It turns a component of one of these joins was very rotten, and after millennia of burial, it was essentially turning into powder! This spongy material had been encased in wood glue and attached back in place in the wrong way. The component was jutting out, held in place by a thin strip of soft wood and very, very vulnerable to breakage.

After the join was poulticed, the messy wood-glue to be removed shows white.

After the join was poulticed, the messy wood-glue to be removed shows white.

 

A close-up of the coating.

A close-up of the coating.

 

A view of the extensive coating on wooden piece.

A view of the extensive coating on wooden piece.

To restore the original appearance of the join and to stabilize the deterioration observed. The glue had to be softened with a poultice of cotton soaked with acetone. I then meticulously cleaned the surfaces of as much coating as possible, stabilizing large flakes and powdered wood as I went.

The wood, partially cleaned, and a fragile sliver waiting to be attached.

The wood, partially cleaned, and a fragile sliver waiting to be attached.

This was then reattached in the correct position, and a soft fill was inserted to support the join. The adhesive was left to dry overnight.

The fill supporting the newly corrected join.

The fill supporting the newly corrected join.

 

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The adhesive, bulked with cellulose powder, is applied.

 

Ancient Egypt

A padded clamp is opposed around the repair.

 

The stabilized clamp is left as the adhesive dries.

The stabilized clamp is left as the adhesive dries.

The result was a more accurate representation of the original– and beautiful!–construction scheme.

 

 

SHARK!

This post was written by Diana Birney, Supervising Marine Biologist for our upcoming SHARK! exhibit, opening August 29, 2015.

We fear them, we love them, and we are fascinated by them. We have a whole week on television dedicated to them that draws millions of viewers every year. Humans have an amazing obsession with this interesting group of animals, especially considering that we really don’t know that much about them.

It’s clear from the popularity of movies like Jaws and Sharknado that we love to be scared by sharks. While there is a good reason to give sharks their space, they are not the crazed “man-eaters” that Hollywood has often portrayed. In fact, since 1911 there have only been two deaths and less than fifty unprovoked attacks by sharks in Texas.

You’re actually more likely to be struck by lightning than you are to be attacked by a shark.

However, every time you enter a body of water, you should go in with the knowledge that a shark could potentially be there. When it comes down to it, it’s their space — not ours.

That doesn’t mean that you can never go in the water again, it just means be smart about what you do in the ocean…

So go to the beach, bring your sunscreen (and reapply it often!). But also bring your knowledge of what lives in the habitat you are about frolic in. Feel like you don’t know enough? Don’t worry! Here’s a nice set of guidelines for your next trip:

1. Sharks aren’t searching for humans to eat

There is no evidence to suggest that sharks like eating people. In fact, considering the numbers of people that go to the beach and the attack statistics, it would seem that sharks DON’T like eating people. A beach is a potential buffet at certain times of the year, but the sharks don’t seem to take advantage of it (good news for us!).

When people do get bitten, it’s usually one bite and the shark lets go. This is similar to the other night when I had a plate of broccoli I was going to town on and ran into a bite of mushroom (I hate mushrooms). I promptly spit that nasty bite out and went back to my broccoli feast (YUM). Sharks tend to follow schools of fish or, for our larger shark friends, mammals such as seals. Schools tend to frequent coast lines and often when someone is bitten there is a school of fish in the area that the shark was intending to chow down on.

2. Sharks have AMAZING noses

Sharks can sense blood in a ratio of one part per million. They also have sensors on their noses called ampullae of Lorenzini. These are electroreceptors that can sense the electrical field given off by everything swimming around in the ocean — including you and me! If a wounded person or animal enters the water, a shark can be drawn to the blood but also to the electrolytes that pour out of the wound as well.

There is a common idea that punching a shark on the nose will make it less likely to attack you. This stems from the fact that the ampullae are all over the nose and punching the shark might disrupt the electroreceptors. Another reason this (sometimes) works is that most sharks like certain prey items and most of those prey items don’t know how to punch — giving the shark a strong clue that it won’t like eating you. 

However, it’s important to not just go around punching sharks… right under their nose is a huge mouth with lots of teeth, and you may end up just losing an arm instead of scaring the sharks.

3. “There’s a chance I’ll bite if you bother me too long” – sharks

This summer there was a shark bite incident off of the coast of California with a White Shark. A swimmer got too close to a fishing line that caught a shark. The shark had been on the line long enough to be mad at everyone and everything. When the swimmer approached it, unaware it was even there, the shark lashed out. The moral of the story is that sharks, like dogs and cats, have no way to communicate with us that they are uncomfortable or in pain. The only avenue available is their teeth. Many bites are exploratory or just to say “BACK OFF.” 

A good rule of thumb in any environment is that if it has teeth it can/will bite.

4) Stay with your swimming buddy

Having a buddy is essential for beach safety. Rip tides can pull even proficient swimmers down and out into the ocean (and are actually much more likely to happen to you than a shark attack). Sharks, just like other apex predators, e.g., lions, tend to go after prey that is separated from the pack — it makes for an easy dinner.  So if you are swimming alone a shark might think you are a solitary prey item. If you are with someone else, the shark might still think you are prey, but will be less likely to attack a small “pack” rather than a solitary animal.

The buddy system is also beneficial just in case something does happen. Your buddy can get help and report exactly what happened in case you are in shock or missing.

 

5) Daytime is the best playtime

Most sharks hunt at night, dawn and dusk when they can see the best. Fortunately, most people go to the beach during the day. Just be extra careful if you are going out in the evening or at night because the shark can see you better than you can see them, guaranteed. However, if you are in an area frequented by White Sharks remember that they tend to hunt during the day when their traditional prey are more active.

6) Play smart

It’s important to know what signs indicate a higher chance of sharks in the area. Sandbars and the drop offs around sand bars are a common shark hang out. Sharks can swim in extremely shallow water, so don’t let the low water level lull you into a false sense of security.

An easy sign of sharks to watch out for is the presence of other animals. I know it’s hard to stay back when you see a bunch of fish in the water (as a Marine Biologist, I can be guilty of not staying away from schooling fish), but sharks enjoy snacking on large groups of fish. We wouldn’t want you to end up a morsel in the shark’s buffet.

However, we can’t always see schooling fish. Don’t worry too much since there are more obvious signs you can watch out for including: birds, dolphins/porpoises and lots of splashing. Birds will attack schools from the air, so if you see many birds diving in a particular spot, you can safely assume there are fish there and will want to stay away from that location. Same with dolphins and porpoises. They eat a lot of the same foods that sharks eat, so do not assume there are no sharks just because you see dolphins.  Splashing is also a key sign to sharks that prey is in the area since schools of fish tend to ascend and splash around near the surface. So, again, stay away from areas that show signs of splashing, and it’s also a good idea to keep your splashing around to a minimum.

7) Know your local sharks

It’s also good to know your local sharks. The Gulf of Mexico is home to many different species, some sharks you might not see — much less have to worry about. Others, like the Bull shark account for all of the Texas deaths from sharks (don’t be too alarmed, again, there have only been 2 since 1911). We also have thresher (my personal favorite shark), nurse, blacktip, tiger, many different hammerhead species, and many more.

If you followed the news this summer, you might have seen a White Shark named Katherine approaching Texas. Katherine shows us that we can get Great White Sharks in the Gulf. For more information on Katherine and many other tagged sharks you can go to OCEARCH.org. If you are travelling and plan on going to the water, it’s helpful to know what sharks are in the area and how likely your are to see them.

In the long run, it’s important to remember that shark interactions are NOT common, you just want to be prepared and armed with knowledge whenever you hit the beach.

The Houston Museum of Natural Science is teaming up with the Texas State Aquarium and OCEARCH to bring more information and awareness of sharks to Houston with our new SHARK! exhibit

Come visit to learn about (and even touch!) these amazing animals starting August 29!