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Fabergé’s Ties To The English Crown
April 29, 2017 · 2 Comments

  HMNS has been a whilwifnd of activity for the past few months in preparation for our new Fabergé exhibit. Regular visitors to the museum might be surprised to hear this. After all, we’ve been displaying the Dorothy and Artie McFerrin Fabergé Collection at HMNS for years. What could possibly be so different about this […]

Mutant Fossil at HMNS!
April 27, 2017 · Be The First To Comment

Walliserops trifurcatus is a weird looking creature. It’s a Trilobite, which is a kind of Arthropod that existed in great numbers from the Cambrian period (541 million years ago)to the end of the Permian (about 250 million years ago), long before dinosaurs evolved. They were so prolific, and there were so many species of trilobites […]

The Volunteers and the Sounds of HMNS
April 26, 2017 · Be The First To Comment

  My office here at the Houston Museum of Natural Science is basically right outside a public hallway, so I overhear a great variety of things, from surprised exclamations as patrons look up and see the giant stuffed grizzly bear down the hall to hums of confusion as they examine a map (the Hall of […]

How Long Do Butterflies Live? New Data From The Butterfly Center Gives Us Some Answers
April 25, 2017 · Be The First To Comment

How long do butterflies live? It is one of the questions we get most frequently in the Cockrell Butterfly Center, and our replies vary. We may say an average of two weeks, which was the accepted standard based off of a few small scale experiments in the Butterfly Center over the years. We may say […]

HMNS Weekly Happenings
April 24, 2017 · Be The First To Comment

  Lecture – Sex in the Fossil Record by James Washington One of the driving forces of Darwinian evolution is reproduction in all its forms. In this presentation, paleontologist James Washington will focus on the myriad of methods used to continue species by passing on genetic material from one generation to the next. You will […]

May Educator How-To: Make a Roman Mosaic
April 21, 2017 · Be The First To Comment

Mosaics were common features, in both public spaces and private homes, in ancient Rome. Mosaics are beautiful, but also historically important. Mosaics provide a visual record, detailing everyday life, by depicting items such as food, dress, pets, and people. This common art form provides a looking glass into the past. The mosaic below depicts several […]

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Most Popular Posts of All Time

Katydid!…Did she?

Olive – a Giant Long-Legged Katydid from Malaysia – was with us for only a few days, however, she left us with a precious gift; her eggs! Now, will those eggs hatch? We’re keeping our fingers crossed over here that we’ll soon be seeing some cute little katydid babies! This insect has quickly become my […]

HOW TO: Pin a Butterfly

Have you ever seen a piece of art or craft that you think to yourself “I could do that!” but of course you never act on it?  Well, some people do act on that impulse and I’m going to show you how to do just that.  Every now and then I get a phone call from […]

Latest Comments

2012: It’s the end of the world as we know it (and I feel fine)

Read This · April 30, 2017, 3:53 pm

rent a bin Read This https://www.12summersold.com/sitemap948.php

Being Natural: Michelle Connor

Patrice F. Gay · April 30, 2017, 8:54 am

Our son is signed up for Indian Lore on May 13th. Can you tell us what requirements need to be finished/started outside of class?

Fabergé’s Ties To The English Crown

Chris · April 29, 2017, 4:45 pm

Thank you for your vigilance and your humility Sincerely ,Chris

Brian Watt · April 29, 2017, 3:39 pm

Minor: Spelling mistake: Change from "the temporary lone from" to "the temporary loan from". Please delete this comment after fixing spelling.

Beach Bugs!

Erin M. · April 28, 2017, 2:12 pm

Hi! I'm sorry, I'm not familiar with what can be found on the beaches in Australia! Someone there must know!

Photo From You: Insect Identification

Erin M. · April 28, 2017, 1:33 pm

Possibly. Please send your photo to blogadmin@hmns.org. Thanks!

Don’t Touch Me! Seven Native Texas Bugs That Should Not Be Handled

Emily Francis Stewart · April 27, 2017, 9:47 am

It 's really great to know.Thank you for sharing.

Beach Bugs!

deluxe_fox · April 27, 2017, 9:21 am

i want to know the thing that lives under the sand at my beach. I don't always step on one but often enough to have learned there is some kind of THING that lives beneath the sand (usually above the high tide mark but not always!) and if you tread on it just right, and the soft part of your foot touches it, it STINGS you with something that is mildly painful for about twenty minutes, maybe half as painful as a bee sting - and then itches like crazy for weeks afterwards. Location - Two Rocks, Western Australia. (as if all the snakes weren't enough!)

Color me Carmine: Cochineal bugs in our food and drink

Hennie · April 26, 2017, 8:02 am

I live in Bloemfontein,South Africa.Many years ago we could buy Cochineal (extract) almost anywhere.I would like to know if this is still available and wherefrom.?

Eeeeeeeeeeewww, Roaches!!!!

Cade · April 22, 2017, 1:26 pm

Great read. I can finally tell many of my friends to stop killing the roaches and simply put them outside. All beings have their place on this planet!

Diplocaulus: The Boomerang-Head Amphibian

‘Hammerhead Salamander’ Photograph - Fullact Trending Stories With The Laugh Mixture · April 22, 2017, 8:00 am

[…] that purportedly showed a “hammerhead salamander” (also known as the “boomerang-head”, or diplocaulus) started circulating on social […]

Photo From You: Insect Identification

george · April 21, 2017, 12:10 pm

if I have a picture of a bee can you identify it?

The Roche Limit: Why does Saturn have rings?

Samples and Statistics: Distinguishing Populations of Hot Jupiters in a Growing Dataset · April 18, 2017, 11:02 am

[…] migration theories, as well as what the minimum allowed distance to the host star (the famous Roche separation distance, aRoche) would be in each case, are as […]

Insect Insight: Eastern Lubber Grasshopper

Cepasrenan · April 13, 2017, 7:33 pm

I saw one in my garage , i panic!! And kill fumigate within one hour arround my house i tough is was a criket/ cokarouch/ black widow kind of thing after this i feel sorry

Invasion of the bulbuls: Houston team studies new invasive species

Julie Rhoades · April 13, 2017, 12:55 pm

There is a pair regularly visiting the tree outside my office window in the West Alabama Upper Kirby River Oaks area. They eat berries until run off by the nesting robins. I have not seen any aggressive behavior by the bulbuls.

Color me Carmine: Cochineal bugs in our food and drink

- Bed Bugs Heat Treatment · April 8, 2017, 7:20 pm

[…] of the red coloring we use in food is actually made of crushed bugs. Yep, creepy, crawly […]

Sky Happenings in April, 2017

Dennis Hungerford · April 7, 2017, 3:56 am

I was wondering if la-ninja / el-ninjo could be caused by the black hole of our Milkyway? The travel of weather centers away from the equator and drift toward the poles in an eastward pattern ( la-ninja) I don't know where or better what part of the sky the center of the milkyway resides? I may not be expanding myself very well. Thank you Dennis

James Wooten · April 6, 2017, 2:50 pm

The absolute best place to go would be out to our George Observatory on a clear Saturday night. Not only will you have somewhat darker skies (although not perfect), you'll have dozens of volunteers to help you learn how to use your 'scope. Our volunteers bring a wide variety of telescopes, perhaps even one like yours! (I recommend arriving before dark, so you and the volunteer(s) helping you can see what you're setting up). Even better, once you've learned to use the telescope, you can come out and be one of our volunteers. Actually using your equipment to share the sky with our visitors is a great way to explore its capabilities.

Larry Smith · April 6, 2017, 10:05 am

Thanks James, I’m just a rookie getting started with a Celestron 10” CPC. I live in Friendswood and wonder if there are areas not far from here that might offer clear views and less light pollution where a guy could spend a few hours learning to use the equipment? Your suggestions would be appreciated.

The Roche Limit: Why does Saturn have rings?

Samples and Statistics: Distinguishing Populations of Hot Jupiters in a Growing Dataset | astrobites · April 5, 2017, 8:36 am

[…] migration theories, as well as what the minimum allowed distance to the host star (the famous Roche separation distance, aRoche) would be in each case, are as […]

Color me Carmine: Cochineal bugs in our food and drink

You Know What Red Food Dye Is Made Of, Right? - Bed Bugs Heat Treatment · April 4, 2017, 1:50 pm

[…] of the red coloring we use in food is actually made of crushed bugs. Yep, creepy, crawly […]


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