Sky events for October 2016


October 6, 2016
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1st Quarter 1st-quarter1October 8, 11:33pm

Fullfull

October 15, 11:23pm

3rd Quarter3rd-quarter

October 22, 2:14pm

Newnew

October 30, 12:38pm

 

This star map shows the Houston sky at 10 pm CDT on October 1, 9 pm CDT on October 15, and 8 pm CDT on October 31.  To use the map, put the direction you are facing at the bottom. 

oct-sky1

The Summer Triangle is high in the west.  The ‘teapot’ of Sagittarius sets in the southwest.  How long can you follow Saturn as it sets in twilight?  The Great Square of Pegasus is high in the east at dusk. To the south and east, we see a vast dim area of stars known as the ‘Celestial Sea’, where only Fomalhaut stands out. 

 

Venus is a little higher in the evening sky this month. Look low in the west in evening twilight. On Saturday, October 29, Venus passes three degrees below Saturn.

Mars and Saturn are now in the southwest at dusk.

Mars continues to fade each night as Earth leaves it farther and farther behind. Also, it moves faster than Saturn against the background stars, so you can watch Mars pull away from Saturn this month.

Jupiter emerges into the morning sky this month. Look low in the east at dawn.

The Big Dipper is to the left of the North Star, with its handle pointing up. From that handle, you can ‘arc to Arcturus’ in the west at dusk.

Antares, brightest star of Scorpius, the Scorpion, is in the southwest, with the ‘teapot’ of Sagittarius to its left. Saturn is right above Antares. The Summer Triangle is almost overhead. The stars of summer remain high in the early evening sky. Meanwhile, the Great Square of Pegasus is high in the east at dusk. Autumn is here.

Moon Phases in October 2016:

1st Quarter Oct. 8, 11:33 p.m.

Full Oct. 15, 11:23 p.m.

Last Quarter Oct. 22, 2:14 p.m.

New Oct. 30, 12:38 p.m.

Just after midnight on Wednesday, October 19, the waning gibbous Moon occults the bright star Aldebaran. Aldebaran blinks out of view at 12:04 am as the Moon passes in front of it and reappears at 1:06 am from behind the dark limb of the Moon.

In fact, the Moon has occulted Aldebaran at least once a month since January 2015; this will continue until September 3, 2018. However, many of these events are not visible from North America or happen in daytime for us. This occultation, however, is clearly visible from Houston (weather permitting, of course). The waning gibbous Moon and Aldebaran will be high in the east by midnight. You may need a telescope to watch the actual moment of disappearance, as the sunlit lunar disk will wash out Aldebaran. The reappearance, however, is noticeable in binoculars since the opposite limb of the Moon will be dark. We’ll see another occultation of Aldebaran on Monday evening, December 12, with the Moon one day before full.

Come see us Saturday nights at the George Observatory! On most clear Saturday nights at the George Observatory, you can hear me do live star tours on the observation deck with a green laser pointer.

Our annual Astronomy Day at the George Observatory is on Saturday, October 8! On Astronomy Day we have activities from 3-10 pm, and all of the telescopes, even the ones that normally cost money to look through, are free. Surf to www.astronomyday.net for more information.

James
Authored By James Wooten

James is the Planetarium Astronomer at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. He teaches students every school morning in the planetarium, and also answers astronomy questions from the public.

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