VIDEO: Our New Corpse Flower. Help Us Name Her!

Our new corpse flower needs a name! We’ve had over 250 posts with suggestions so far – but we’ve also heard from some people who need a little…inspiration.

So, we thought we’d introduce you to our newest little leaf. And here she is!

Can’t see the video? Click here.

You’ve got until next Friday, July 15 to get your suggestions in – make sure you leave them at the comments section of the post linked below. Our committee (including @CorpzFlowrLois herself) will pick our top 5 favorites, which we’ll post on Monday, July 18. Be sure to check back and vote for your favorite!

Post Your Name Ideas Here!

49 thoughts on “VIDEO: Our New Corpse Flower. Help Us Name Her!

  1. Mariana (nearby trench-deepest earth location; corpse flower-“stinkiest” plant, OR
    Mariah Rose (wind carries “parfum” to attract pollinators)

  2. Pam. After all she was donated by CultureMap, and since neither culture or map is a suitable name, just spell map backwards….Pam.

  3. Why you should call her “CHLOE”! The name comes from the Greek χλόη (khlóē), meaning “young green shoot” and is one of the many names of the Greek goddess Demeter. And since her genus name of Amorphophallus titanum comes from Ancient Greek amorphos, “without form, misshapen” + phallos, “phallus”, and titan, “giant”….and Demeter was the greek goddess of the harvest, she presided also over the sanctity of marriage, the sacred law, and the cycle of life and death……so makes perfect since that she should be called “CHLOE”! And the fact that my oldest daughter who is going to college in the fall is named “CHLOE”! It would be a really nice reminder of times when I would take her to the Houston Museum of Natural Science when she was a little girl.

  4. The scent attracts pollinating flies, which you must _shoo_ away to see the bloom.

    Imelda.

  5. Petra.

    I was thinking ‘Stinky Pete’ but Pete does not work since the Corpse Flower is by definition female. Hence the suggestion – Petra.

  6. Eunice – means Victorious, and Lois was the mother of Eunice in the New Testament.

  7. Did some research. Libitina is the Roman goddess of deaths, corpses, and funerals. They go well together – Lois and Libitina. And you could call it “Tina” for short.

    (It also kinda looks like Audrey II from Little Shop of Horrors.)

  8. Ethan or Brian means strong since the flower has a strong smell or odor. I like the idea of going with a male name.

  9. I think the name LISA MARIE or FIONA…Clark is too corny and expected. Think out the box or pot in this case!

  10. carri (because she’s a carrion flower)
    OR
    b.b. (bunga bangkai, as they call her in indonesia, where she’s from)

  11. Other suggested names are Diantha meaning Divine Flower or Delphina meaing little flower.

  12. Feteo would be interesting, it means “have a bad odor” in Latin. Nidor is also Latin, meaning “reek, smell, odor”.

  13. Roxanne.
    I was just given a corpse flower. It is a few inches tall. What do I feed it? and where do I get it? Thanks

  14. Esme or Cullen.

    In reference to all those preteen Twilight books and movies. Cullen is the last name of the vampire family in that series. Esme is the name of the vampire family “mother”. Vampire = dead = corpse flower.

  15. If not Latin, then maybe a little Spanish flair? “Fragancia” is spanish for aroma, while the feminized “Apestosa” means smelly. Could be some interesting names also.

  16. Names:

    Samson or Harold if we decide on a male name or Maude, from Harold and Maude.

  17. Kinda liking the idea of Fiona (as in Shrek, people!)

    Fartunia…that one is funny.

    Will there eventually be a poll of the maybe Favorite 5 suggestions as chosen by the HMNS staff? That would be good. Looking forward to a selection…and when it does get around to blooming.

    For how to take care of a Titan Arum (alan k above), see:

    https://gustavus.edu/biology/titanarum/faq.php

    http://www.aroid.org/genera/amorphophallus/bonnculture/

    I have now seen two in bloom…one at SFASU a few years ago and then I also saw Lois.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>