HMNS Expansion: Breaking Ground Nov. 19!

HMNS Expansion - Breaking Ground Nov. 19, 2009!
We’re breaking ground on our new Duncan Family Wing on
Nov. 19, 2009 – but we still have $25 million more to raise
before we can complete the expansion.We need your help!

We’ve come a long way in 100 years- and we’re going even farther.

We’re expanding science education in Houston for the 21st century and working to build the finest science museum in the country. And we need your help!

We’ve raised over $60 million from generous individuals, foundations and corporations that are committed to our mission of science education, and know how important science and a science-literate population will be to the future of Houston.

Now, we’re breaking ground on our new wing on Nov. 19, 2009 – but we must raise $25 million more before we can complete the expansion and meet our goal of becoming the world’s best science museum, right here in Houston.

Help us build for the future of Houston by sharing your thoughts on why HMNS is important to you, your family and to Houston – or join our cause on Facebook to help us spread the word about our upcoming expansion, and donate to help us reach our goal.

Learn more about what’s coming to the new Houston Museum of Natural Science from HMNS President Joel A. Bartsch:

Let us know why a bigger, better HMNS is important to you. Click here.

Donate to the HMNS@100: Building for a Second Century of Science capital campaign. Click here.



We've come a long way in 100 years


This is the floor plan of the Westheimer Natural History Museum
at the Houston Public Library. In 1922, this is where the Attwater collection
- one of the founding collections of the Houston Museum of Natural Science
- was displayed. Learn more about the history of HMNS – and where we’re headed
in the 21st century – on ourCentennial web site, 100.hmns.org

3 thoughts on “HMNS Expansion: Breaking Ground Nov. 19!

  1. Hello,

    Would anyone be able to forward a question to Dr. Bakker? I would like to know what he thinks of the new theory that Torosaurus is the adult growth stage of Triceratops.

    Thanks, and congradulations on the expantion!

    Michael

  2. Hi Michael! I will forward your question to Dr. Bakker. He’s in Texas this week on a dig with the museum, however – so it may be a few weeks before he has a chance to respond. Thanks for reading!

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