The Truth is in the Tooth

When you take a bite into a juicy hamburger or dive into a pile of asparagus, do you ever wonder how you’re able to eat the way you do? Humans, by nature, are omnivores; this means that we eat fruits, veggies, and various meats. If you NEVER saw a person eat, though, you could still tell what his diet was! The truth is in the tooth, my friend.

something will jump in my mouth, if i just wait long enough
Creative Commons License photo credit: PhyrePh0X

Canine teeth (you could call them your vampire teeth) are found in carnivores, or animals that eat meat.  For instance, you wouldn’t find any blunted teeth in the mouth of a Velociraptor! Molars, on the other hand, are used by herbivores (animals that eat plants) for grinding hard to digest foods. Try looking into the mouth of camel sometime and see what you find – watch out though, they spit.

Diphyodont animals, like mammals, have two sets of teeth in their lifetime.
Polyphyodont animals like sharks have teeth that are constantly being lost and replaced; they grow a new set every few weeks. Can you imagine losing every tooth in your mouth twice a month? Sounds pretty terrible, but at least you’d collect a lot of quarters under your pillow! Incidentally, the Shark Tooth Fairy is also the Queen of England.

Elephant Tongue
Creative Commons License photo credit: greggoconnell

Another useful tool for eating is the ever-important tongue. Some tongues are attached and cannot be stuck out, like the elephant (no raspberries there,) and some are used for more than just eating. Cats’ tongues are rough to aid in grooming, for instance. A frog’s tongue is sticky to trap their food and bring it to their mouths. Did you know a frog uses its eyes to swallow? If they used their tongues, they’d choke.

If you find yourself without the opportunity to observe the mouths and eating habits of wild and extinct animals, come on down to the Museum! It’s the only place in town where you can see a poison dart frog in action and view a T. rex locked in battle with a duck-billed dinosaur.

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