which is a meteorite?


May 14, 2008
1116 Views

Erin B
Authored By Erin B Blatzer

Erin is the Director of Business Development at HMNS. In a past life, she was a public relations and online marketing dynamo at HMNS.

8 responses to “which is a meteorite?”

  1. Matt says:

    Hi..I have a rock that looks like the meteorite, its heavy for its size, magnetic, and has a black coating, with some exposed rust on one section..I dont see any holes, im guessing its either a meteorite or iron slag..I would need an expert to look at it, do I need to make an appointment for you to examine it?..Also, I believe I found some Green Jade in its raw form here in Houston..It was in a load of fill material that a dumptruck delivered..Im not sure where he got it, but I assume it was from a dig pit in Houston, has any Jade been discovered in Houston that you know of?..thanks for your time..Matt

  2. Jenni says:

    I also have a rock that is very large I found on top of the mountains that has all the signs of a meteor. I was wondering if I could send a picture to someone to see what they thought it was.
    Thx, Jenni

  3. James Wooten says:

    You could send a picture to me at jwooten@hmns.org, and I could see if it resembles my samples

  4. Caleb says:

    hey, i have a collection of a few different types of magnetic rocks or meteorites i found in the Mojave desert. I will admit to being a beginner in meteor hunting but i am learning as i go. I have been doing my home work i guess you can say, and im sure i have at least 3 in my collection. i can send pics! can anyone help me out?

  5. Erin F says:

    Hi Caleb, You can send your pictures to blogadmiN@hmns.org and we’ll forward them to James to see what he can tell you about them. Thanks for your comment!

  6. Gord M says:

    Hello I was cleaning my yard and i found on my yard 4 black rocks.
    I have lived here for 10 yrs and have never seen anything of this type near or around my yard or neighborhood, When i picked them up they left an impression in the yard where they were laying. The holes in the ground were all on an angle
    They were within 2 or 3 ft of each other
    Then i looked at them a bit closer and noticed molten lines on one side only.
    I then got thinking that they could be possible meteorites.
    I dont believe they are slag, but if they are then how did they get there.
    So i did some searching and did all the tests asked, and they did do just that
    Magnetic, Melted edges, Very heavy in comparison to a rock of the same size. etc.

  7. Gord M says:

    Would like to know whom i may contact in regards to my findings
    I also have pics i can send as well
    Posted Apr 15 12:07pm

    Thank you; Gordon M

  8. Fayza says:

    Please send photos to webeditorAThmnsDOTorg.

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